The People God Uses


Daily Bible Reading – Joshua 1,2; Psalm 37; 1 Corinthians 3

Today’s Key Passage – Joshua 2:1-24

I heard a story the other day about two Christians who were talking about sharing their faith with others.  The first man asked the second about the last time he shared his faith with another person.  With a sigh and a slight chuckle, the second man said, “I don’t really know enough to share my faith with others.  I might say the wrong thing or do the wrong thing.  I leave all of that to the “professional believers” (meaning pastors, ministers, missionaries, etc.).”  When I heard this story, it really got me thinking – I believe there are many Christians that feel this way.  They feel they do not know enough.  They feel they are not strong enough.  They believe God is only looking to use “professional believers” to advance His Kingdom.  Of course, countless times in the Bible we find out that is simply not true.  For example, none of the twelve disciples Jesus chose was a “professional believer”.  Moses was not a “professional believer”.  In fact, many times in the Bible we find that God uses the people we might least expect to advance His kingdom.  Today’s key passage is a good example of God using an “amateur” to do His work.

Joshua had just taken over leading the Israelites following Moses death, and he decided to send two spies into Canaan to get some intelligence on what he would be facing when they entered the Promised Land.  When the two spies arrived, they stayed at the home of a prostitute named Rahab.  Is it just me, or does this seem like an unlikely choice?  Why would two Israelite spies, themselves children of God, choose to stay with a prostitute?  Knowing what we know about the Israelites at this time, you would think they would have avoided prostitutes, which leads us to the logical conclusion that God must have led them to Rahab’s house.  God knew that Rahab was willing to help and could fill a role that God needed, because she had faith in Him.  She was certainly not a “professional believer”, but instead of focusing on her past, God knew that her faith would make her useful.  In addition, she really did not know a lot about God.  She had heard stories about Him and knew about His almighty power, but that was about it.  Even given her limited knowledge of God, she still stepped out in faith, hid the spies, and protected them from the soldiers who were looking for them.  She later told the spies that she helped them because she knew that their God was the one true God.  Because of her faith, we will find out later in Joshua 6:22-23 that she was spared when the Israelites took the city.

Have you ever shied away from sharing your faith because you are not a “professional believer”?  Have you ever wondered if you “know enough” about God to really witness to others?  Have you ever thought that if you did step out in faith that it might not go well?  If so, I pray that you will read and meditate on the story of Rahab.  God does not just want to use pastors, ministers, and missionaries to do His work on Earth.  He does not want the “amateurs” to just sit on the sidelines cheering on the “professionals”.  He wants you to get in the game!  He wants you to share your faith.  He wants you to share His Word.  He wants you to reach other people for Him.  He wants to use you to advance His Kingdom.  It does not matter what you have done in your past.  It does not matter if you are an “unlikely” candidate.  It does not matter how much you know, or how much you have studied.  If you have faith in God, he can use you.  All you have to do is take a step.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Leaving Behind a Legacy


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 32-34; 1 Corinthians 2

Today’s Key Passage – Deuteronomy 34:1-12

In today’s key passage, we read about the death of Moses and the end of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible).  Moses only spent 120 years on this earth thousands of years ago, yet he is still widely known today and will forever be listed as the greatest prophet Israel had ever known.  Moses led the nation of Israel out of the slavery in Egypt.  He led them through the desert for 40 years.  He led them to the very edge of the Promised Land.  Even though he was not permitted to enter the land God had promised to the Israelites, he was able to prepare them for the battles that would come upon their entry.  Moses left behind a legacy.  Moses was not born of greatness.  He was not born a leader.  By his own admission, he was just a simple shepherd who was “slow of speech”, but he still left behind a legacy that transcends time.  He built that legacy not through his own power or his own works, but through the power of God.

As most of us get older, we begin to wonder what our legacy will be.  Will we even leave one?  Will we be remembered on this earth?  Many times, people try to build their legacy by taking all the wrong steps.  Some people think that if they work hard enough at their jobs they will build a lasting legacy.  Others believe that if they make enough money or own enough “stuff” they will leave a lasting legacy.  The sad truth for these people is that all of those things are temporary.  The only way to leave a lasting legacy is through the power of God.  It is by God working through us that we are able to build a legacy that truly transcends time.  It is by the power of God that we are able to touch other people’s hearts so deeply that we will forever be remembered.  That, my friends, is a true legacy.  At the end of your life, you will not be remembered for the job you did, the money you made, or the things you owned.  You will be remembered for how you touched other people’s lives.  When you lead someone to Christ, you build a lasting legacy.  When you serve others, you build a lasting legacy.  When you truly love others more than you love yourself, you build a lasting legacy.  Most importantly, when you love God with all of your heart, soul, and mind, you build a lasting legacy.  God gives us the power and the ability to love others unconditionally, and He is the only true source for building a legacy that will last in the hearts and minds of others forever.  Press into Him daily.  Strive to put Him first in everything you do.  Pray for the power to reflect the perfect love He has for you onto others.  Then, like Moses, you can be sure that you will leave behind a true legacy.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Divisions in the Church


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 30,31; Psalm 40; 1 Corinthians 1

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Corinthians 1:10-17

During Paul’s third missionary journey in Ephesus, he received word of some problems that the church in Corinth was facing.  One of the problems plaguing the church at that time was disunity.  The Corinthians heard the Gospel from many different sources – some heard about Christ from Paul, while others heard from Peter and Apollos.  While Paul, Peter, and Apollos were all preaching the same Gospel, they each had their own style of preaching.  Because of the different styles of the preachers, the members of the church started to cling to the messenger instead of the message.  In 1 Corinthians 1:12, Paul explains the issue when he says, “What I mean is this: One of you says, “I follow Paul”; another, “I follow Apollos”; another, “I follow Cephas”; still another, “I follow Christ.”  This division in the church was hurting the church as a whole and was keeping the Corinthians from reaching their full potential.

We still run the risk of having divisions in the church today.  This could be divisions in a particular church congregation, or divisions of the church as a whole.  This becomes especially prevalent when we begin to think that “our way” is the only way.  As we all know, there are many different denominations of the Christian church and there are many different styles of worship.  In some churches, people sing hymns from a book while listening to an organist, while in other churches people sing popular Christian songs with a live band.  In some churches, you will see people with their hands raised in the air during worship, while in other churches that is completely taboo.  Some people think that their preacher is the best preacher and will gladly tell you so, while others believe the same thing about their preacher.  One believer might like a particular Christian author, while another believer might not.  All of these differences can lead, to a certain degree, to divisions in the body of Christ as a whole.

So why is this such an issue?  Why is disunity in the body of Christ or in a particular church congregation so bad?  To find the best answer to this question, we need only to look to Christ himself.  In Mark 3:25, Jesus said, “If a house is divided against itself, that house cannot stand.”  Disunity ruins churches and destroys their witness for Christ.  As we attempt to reach the lost and tell them about Jesus, we will not be nearly as successful if our church is divided.  We are all brothers and sisters in Christ.  We all worship the same God.  We are all saved by the same grace.  Do not allow your allegiance to any particular group or any particular style outweigh your allegiance to Christ.  Do not allow the externals get in the way of what is truly important.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Picking and Choosing Sin


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 28,29; Galatians 6

Today’s Key Passage – Galatians 6:12-18

Near the end of Paul’s letter to the Galatians, he made one last attempt to explain that they were being led astray by false teaching.  In today’s key passage, Paul states that whether they were circumcised or uncircumcised really did not mean anything – what truly mattered most was that they were a new creation in Christ.  In addition, Paul makes an interesting point that I would like to focus on today.  He states that, “Not even those who are circumcised obey the law, yet they want you to be circumcised that they may boast about your flesh.” (Galatians 6:13)  See, the Judaizers were making a big deal about the fact that the Gentiles in Galatia were uncircumcised, but all the while, they were not following all of the other laws from the Old Testament.  The Judaizers were determining what was considered an important law that needed to be followed versus an unimportant law that did not need to be followed.  In effect, the Judaizers were picking and choosing what was considered a sin.

While it is easy for us to look back now on the Judaizers and realize what they were doing and condemn them for it, the sad truth is that most of us do the same thing from time to time.  We have all had moments where we have categorized sins.  For most people, sins are viewed in much the same way that the world views crime.  There are major crimes and minor crimes.  We all know that in most places around the world, murder is a serious crime.  Running a stop sign, on the other hand, is typically not that big of a deal.  The problem here is that it is relatively easy to take that same system of categorizing crimes and apply it to sin.  When we do that, we think that killing someone is a “major” sin but hating someone is only a “minor” sin, for example.  Most people agree that theft is a sin, but they easily justify the telling of a “little white lie”.  Likewise, most people agree that adultery is a sin, but they fail to see that lusting after another person or looking at pornography are also sins.  When we attempt to categorize sin or choose what is acceptable, we miss the whole point.

The simple truth is this – God does not distinguish between “major” sins and “minor” sins.  To a perfect God, all sin is sin and He abhors it.  In fact, because of His infinite perfection, He cannot even stand to be around sin in any way.  The Bible does not say that the wages of some sin is death.  It does not say that the wages of really bad sin is death.  It simply says, “For the wages of sin is death”  (Romans 6:23)  All sin.  Period.  I understand that what I am saying is not the “popular” view of sin.  The “popular” view is that some sin is not that bad and that as long as we try really hard to be a good person we will be OK and will make it to Heaven.  This is an easy message to preach and is well received by the audience, but it is simply not Biblically sound.  The wages of sin is death.  Does that sound harsh?  Does that message seem gloomy?  Does it seem like no matter how hard we try we will never be able to live up to God’s perfect standard?  If so, then guess what – that is the whole point!  It is harsh.  It is gloomy.  We cannot live up to God’s prefect standard on our own.  It does not matter how hard we try, it will never happen.  Paul could not do it.  Peter could not do it.  Mother Teresa could not do it.  Only Jesus lived a perfect and blameless life.  He came here because He knew that none of us could be perfect.  He knew that all of us were going to fall short of God’s standard, so He lived a perfect life for us.  He allowed Himself to die for us.  He allowed Himself to be buried for us, and three days later, He was raised from the dead, and now He sits at the right hand of God and intercedes for us.  His perfection makes all of us look perfect in the eyes of God.  We are not saved by what we have done or what we can do; we are saved by what He has already done.  We are saved by grace through faith in Jesus Christ.  Do not allow yourself to fall into the trap of categorizing sin.  Understand that all sin is the same in the eyes of God, and put your faith and your focus where it belongs – on Jesus.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Principles of Discipline


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 25-27; Galatians 5

Today’s Key Passage – Deuteronomy 25:1-3

Today’s key passage may appear at first to be a bit controversial.  In it, Moses tells the Israelites that when two men have a dispute they should go to the court to have the judges decide the dispute.  If one of the men is found guilty and deserves to be beaten, the judge should flog him in his presence, but it should not exceed forty lashes.  Now for most of us, the idea of flogging someone seems detestable.  When I think of flogging, my immediate reaction is to think of Christ on the day of His crucifixion, and it places an image in my mind that makes my stomach turn.  For that reason, when I first read this passage today I immediately dismissed it as a topic to write about.  However, as is often the case, this passage kept coming back to me.  I kept thinking about it and the imagery of the words would not leave my mind, so I decided to really study the passage again.  As I did, I kept three things in mind.  First, I remembered that this was written for a civilization that was much different then ours.  At the time, public floggings were commonplace and were the accepted method of punishment for a crime.  Secondly, I remembered that God never changes.  The God who told Moses to write these words in the Bible is the same God that we still worship today.  He has never changed and will never change.  Finally, I remembered that everything in the Bible has a purpose and everything teaches us a lesson.  What lesson could I find in these words that would apply to us today? Applying those three criteria to the reading, I found that the passage took on a new meaning for me.  Instead of focusing on the brutality of the method, I instead saw that the underlying principles of discipline in these words is absolutely sound.

Before you think I am condoning flogging another person, let me explain what I am talking about.  Most of us at one time or another are in a position to discipline another person.  Whether it involves disciplining our children, an employee, or another believer we may be called to provide a level of discipline at some point in our lives.  In today’s key passage, I believe we can learn three important principles of discipline that we can apply to all of these situations that may arise.  First, we learn that before any discipline takes place, we must first determine whether a person is guilty.  Did the person really do what we think he did, or is there a misunderstanding?  Everyone deserves a fair “trial” before any type of discipline is enforced.

Assuming we find that the person is indeed guilty, the second principle we learn is that the discipline needs to be immediate.  Once we have determined that a punishment is necessary, we cannot put it off – we must act now.  Imagine the following scenario: Imagine that you explicitly tell your son that he cannot eat a cookie right now because he will spoil his dinner, but your son goes behind your back and eats a cookie anyway.  When you find out about this, you decide to discipline him by not letting him watch TV for the night.  Now imagine that instead of imposing this punishment immediately, you do not say anything now, but two weeks later, you tell your son that he cannot watch TV because of the cookie he ate two weeks ago.  That would not make a lot of sense would it?  Discipline needs to take place immediately.

The third principle of discipline is that the punishment should fit the crime.  Using our illustration above, while taking away TV privileges for a night might seem like a reasonable punishment, taking away TV privileges for two years might be a little bit of overkill.  If we over-discipline, we run the risk of degrading the other person, which should never be our intention.  Discipline should be used to correct another person, not to destroy them emotionally.  Even though we have the power to discipline, we should never go overboard or become unrestrained, as that type of discipline does more harm than good.  When we react in a reasonable way and punish accordingly, we can provide the necessary correction without causing long-term damage to the relationship.

Whether you are a parent, a boss, or another type of leader, disciplining others is a responsibility that should not be taken lightly.  In most cases, the act of disciplining others will not exactly be pleasant, but if we adhere to the three principles of discipline we learn in today’s key passage, we can achieve the intended results without causing any undue damage.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Returning to Slavery


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 22-24; Galatians 4

Today’s Key Passage – Galatians 4:1-9

A couple of days ago when we read Galatians 1, we learned about the Judaizers’ attempts to lead the churches in Galatia astray with a false Gospel.  The Judaizers were trying to convince the Galatians that they needed to follow Jewish laws in order to be saved, instead of relying on Christ’s sacrifice and the grace of God.  Paul was very concerned for the Galatians and was pained by the fact that they were being led astray from the true Gospel.  In today’s key passage, Paul explains to the Galatians what they were really doing by listening to the Judaizers – they were returning to a life of slavery.  He explains that before they turned to God, the Galatians lived as slaves.  They were slaves to sin, slaves to temptation, and slaves to the pressures of this world.  Paul asks the Galatians, “But now that you know God—or rather are known by God—how is it that you are turning back to those weak and miserable principles? Do you wish to be enslaved by them all over again?

Before we were saved, we were all slaves.  We were slaves to our sinful desires and our sinful ways.  We were slaves to trying to live up to the expectations of others.  We were slaves to the ways of the world.  When we found Christ, however, that bondage was broken.  The chains that held us were broken and we were finally free.  We rejoiced in that freedom of knowing that we were saved.  We rejoiced in knowing that our eternal salvation was secured by the cross of Christ.  Sadly, for many Christians, after a period of time that joy begins to fade.  When the pressures of the world begin to overwhelm them, the passion they once felt for God starts to dwindle.  At best, they become lukewarm Christians.  At worst, they backslide completely.  Some are led astray by bad teaching.  Others are led astray by a lack of time or energy that comes from not making God the number one priority in life (in other words, they find that they simply “do not have time” to be a passionate follower of Christ).  Still others are led astray by temptations to sin or by guilt over past sins.  When we feel the pressures coming on – the pressures to be led astray from God – we must remember exactly what we would be returning to if we allow ourselves to stray.  We would be returning to slavery.  We would be giving up the very freedom that Christ’s sacrifice bought for us.  In 2 Peter 2:20-21, the Apostle Peter writes, “If they have escaped the corruption of the world by knowing our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and are again entangled in it and overcome, they are worse off at the end than they were at the beginning. It would have been better for them not to have known the way of righteousness, than to have known it and then to turn their backs on the sacred command that was passed on to them.”  Once we have been saved, we should do everything we can to keep that fire that once burned so brilliantly for God.  We cannot allow anything to lessen that fire or put it out.  Do you remember how you felt toward God the day you were saved?  Do you remember that passion you felt?  Do you remember that fire?  Do you still feel that way toward Him?  Do not allow the pressures of this world to make you a slave again.  Stay strong in your faith through prayer, keep your fire burning, and maintain your freedom.  Jesus paid a hefty price for that freedom.  Do not allow His sacrifice to go to waste in your life.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Going Into Battle


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 19-21; Galatians 3

Today’s Key Passage – Deuteronomy 20:1-4

As the Israelites stood at the edge of the Promised Land, everyone knew what was coming.  They knew that soon they would cross the Jordan to claim the land that God had promised them.  They also reasoned that most of the land was not going to just be handed over to them – they were going to have to go to war.  Forty years earlier, the Israelites were too afraid to fight for the land.  They were on the edge of the Promised Land then as well, but the fear of battle was too much for them to overcome.  Because of that decision, they spent the next forty years wandering around the desert, and Moses did not want to see this repeated with this generation.  Our key passage today starts with the words, “When you go to war”.  Notice that Moses did not say “if” you go to war, he said “when”.  It was a foregone conclusion that the Israelites were going to have to fight, but Moses tells the Israelites that even though they would see horses, chariots and an army far greater than theirs, they should not be afraid because God was fighting with them and for them.  Moses tells the Israelites that when they go to war, the priest should address the army and say, “Hear, O Israel, today you are going into battle against your enemies. Do not be fainthearted or afraid; do not be terrified or give way to panic before them. For the LORD your God is the one who goes with you to fight for you against your enemies to give you victory.”

All of us must go into battle at some point.  For a lot of us, the battle might not be physical as it was for the Israelites or as it is for the men and women in our armed forces.  Instead, the battles that we fight might be emotional or spiritual in nature.  We might find ourselves in a situation where we need to stand up for what is right.  We might need to correct another Christian.  We might be fighting a temptation or an addiction.  Whatever the case may be, our natural tendency might be to feel fear.  Even if it is not the “shaking in our boots” type of fear we see in the movies, we might still feel a sense of dread knowing what we will ultimately need to do.  When we start to feel those feelings, we should remind ourselves of this passage.  We should remember the Israelites as they stood at the brink of battle for the Promised Land.  We should not be fainthearted.  We should not be afraid.  We should not be terrified or give way to panic.  For the Lord OUR God is the one who goes with us.  He will fight for us against our enemies.  He will give us victory.  Even if we do not achieve immediate victory in our “battle”, we can rest in the knowledge that God has promised each of us an eternal victory in the Kingdom of Heaven.  Knowing that, what is left to fear?


During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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The Importance of Scripture


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 16-18; Psalm 38; Galatians 2

Today’s Key Passage – Deuteronomy 17:14-20

Before entering the Promised Land, Moses took some time to speak to the Israelites and his addresses are chronicled in the book of Deuteronomy.  In today’s reading, Moses spoke to his people about the Passover, the Feast of Weeks, the Feast of Tabernacles, appointing judges, and worshiping other gods.  In addition, in our key passage today he spoke to them about appointing a king.  God did not really want the Israelites to appoint a king because they already had a king – God.  However, God knew that eventually the Israelites were going to want to have a king because all of the other nations had one, so He decided to provide them with some guidelines they should follow in appointing that king.  In His list of guidelines, he tells the Israelites to make sure the king was a person chosen by God.  The king should be another Israelite (as opposed to someone from a foreign land).  Moreover, the king should not be allowed to build up a large army, should not amass great wealth, and should not take many wives as these things would lead him away from God.  (We will find out later in the book of 1 Kings that Israel did not exactly follow this advice and it ultimately led to massive problems, but that is a topic for another day).  Then God gives the Israelites one more command regarding their king.  He says that the king should, “write for himself on a scroll a copy of this law, taken from that of the priests, who are Levites. It is to be with him, and he is to read it all the days of his life”.

Of course, in today’s terms God is telling the king to get a Bible and read it every day.  Why is this important?  Why did God want the king to read the Bible every day?  God answers this question by saying that he should read the Bible daily, “so that he may learn to revere the LORD his God and follow carefully all the words of this law and these decrees and not consider himself better than his brothers and turn from the law to the right or to the left.”  It was important to God that the king of His people read the Bible daily.  He wanted the king to learn about Him and to follow Him.  He wanted the king to humble himself before his God.  He wanted to build a relationship with the king.  Does it not stand to reason that if we asked God, he would tell us the very same thing today?

The fact is that God wants us to read the Bible daily.  His Word is the absolute best way to get to know Him.  It is the best way to learn to follow Him.  In 2 Timothy 3:16-17, Paul tells us that, “all Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.”  Sadly, so many Christians have trouble getting into God’s Word on a daily basis.  When I was first saved, I knew that I should read the Bible every day, but I hardly ever did anything about it.  I made excuses not to read the Bible – I would think, “I am too busy”, “I have too much going on at work today”, or “I am traveling this week” and I would justify my choices to myself.  Fortunately, God made me realize that my thinking was flawed.  I was trying to give Him whatever time I had left over from all of my other activities, instead of putting Him first.  When I finally made a conscious effort to start reading the Bible on a daily basis, a new world opened up to me.  I felt myself getting closer and closer to God.  I began to feel His presence with me and I started to “hear” his voice guiding me in my life.  It was one of the best decisions I have ever made, and I hope it is one you will make too.  If you are already reading the Bible daily, keep going.  Keep pressing closer and closer to God.  If you are having trouble reading His Word on a daily basis, make it a priority even if that means you need to wake up earlier or go to bed later.  If you are waiting until you can find the time to read the Bible, it will never happen.  You have to make the time.  Whether you follow along with our daily reading plan or you find a different one that will work better for you, get into God’s word daily.  I promise you will love the results.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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No Other Gospel


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 13-15; Galatians 1

Today’s Key Passage – Galatians 1:6-24

During Paul’s first missionary trip, he visited several cities in Galatia (which is now Turkey).  Upon his return from that trip, he found out that a group of Jewish Christians (called Judaizers) visited these cities in Galatia and tried to convince the people there that Paul’s teaching was incorrect.  According to the Judaizers, a Gentile first needed to become a Jew before he could become a Christian.  Paul preached the true Gospel and told the Gentiles that they were saved by grace through faith in Jesus Christ.  The Judaizers, on the other hand, preached that all of the Old Testament laws (circumcision, dietary restrictions, etc.) must be followed by Gentiles before they could be saved.  These two competing messages caused a lot of confusion for the new believers in the early Galatian churches, so Paul wrote them a letter (the Book of Galatians) to try to clarify the matter for them.

Our key verse today comes from the first chapter in Galatians.  In it, Paul tells the people of Galatia that he is shocked to see that they have been misled so easily by the Judaizers.  He explains that the Gospel he preached to them was the real Gospel, and that anyone else who told them anything different was lying and should be condemned.  How do we know that Paul’s Gospel was the truth?  Because it came directly from the source.  Paul explains that his Gospel did not come from men – he received it directly by a revelation from Jesus Christ.  Did you ever play that game as a child in which one person whispers a sentence into someone’s ear, who then whispers it into another person’s ear?  The sentence is continually passed in this fashion from person to person until eventually it makes its way back to the original person.  Do you remember how the message at the end was always completely different from the message in the beginning?  Do you also remember that the first person who was told the message was usually the most accurate?  We know that the Gospel as presented in the Bible is true because it comes from people who had first-hand knowledge.  The Gospel in the Bible was given to men like Matthew, Peter, John, and Paul directly from Jesus Christ himself.  There cannot be a more accurate depiction than the one that comes from the people who heard it directly from the Master.

Sadly, today there are still people who preach false Gospels.  Some people do it intentionally in an effort to make money, and other people are simply misguided.  There are people who claim that we need to “do” something to be saved, but the reality is that Jesus has already done everything that needed to be done.  His death on the cross was enough to save us, and nothing we can do will add to that in the eyes of God.  Just like the early Christians, we must still be cautious to avoid being misled by people preaching a false message.  Our greatest tool in avoiding false Gospels is the Bible itself.  When you hear someone talking about a new idea, all we have to do is compare what the person is saying with what the Bible says.  If the preacher conflicts with the Bible, we know what he says is false.  If the preacher makes it more about him than about Christ, we know what he says is false.  Guard your heart against false teaching, and always remember that there is no other Gospel other than the one in the Bible, and there is no other way to be saved than through faith in Jesus Christ.


During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Overcoming Obstacles


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 10-12; Mark 16

Today’s Key Passage – Mark 16:1-8

On the Sunday following Jesus’ death on the cross, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome made their way toward the tomb where Christ was buried.  They carried with them spices to anoint Jesus’ body, which was a sign of love and respect at the time.  The knew where they were going, because they had watched Joseph of Arimathea take Jesus’ body to this particular tomb on the night of His death.  They saw Joseph place Jesus body in the tomb cut out of rock and they watched as he rolled a large stone against the entrance of the tomb.  From Matthew’s account of the Gospel (27:62-66), we know that Pilate placed guards at the tomb and sealed it to prevent anyone from trying to steal the body in an attempt to “fake” the resurrection.  As the women walked toward the tomb, they thought about the obstacles that were in their way.  They talked amongst themselves about the heavy stone that was blocking the opening of the tomb and they wondered how they were going to get inside to anoint Jesus’ body.  They may have also wondered how they were going to get past the guards, as they would likely keep the women from tampering with the body.  Looking back now to that walk toward the tomb, we might wonder what they thought they were going to accomplish by going there.  All of the signs pointed to them not even being able to see Jesus’ body because there were too many obstacles in the way, but the women went anyway.  They knew the obstacles that stood in their way, but they still took the journey and walked closer and closer to Jesus because they loved Him so much.  When they arrived at the tomb, they found that the obstacles they had worried about were no longer an issue.  The stone had been rolled away, and the guards were so afraid that they “shook and became like dead men”. (Matthew 28:4)  That is when the women heard the good news for the first time – Jesus is alive!

There are many times in our lives when the obstacles in front of us might seem insurmountable.  We may be tempted to think that we cannot go on; that we cannot possibly achieve our goals and we might as well just turn around and quit.  The women walking toward the tomb that day could have felt like that.  They might have been tempted to turn around and go home, but instead they kept on walking toward their Savior.  When life’s obstacles seem too great for us to deal with, that is what we must do as well.  Instead of quitting, we must keep walking toward Jesus.  We must step out in faith because of our love for Jesus, and leave everything else to God.  We must trust Him to help us along the way to overcome whatever obstacles life throws at us.  The women did not know how their journey was going to turn out, but they knew that the one thing they could control was what they chose to do that morning, so they chose to keep walking toward Jesus.  We do not know how our journey is going to turn out either, but we can keep walking toward Him, and trust that when we come to our expected obstacle we will find that God has already overcome it.


During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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