Casting Vision to our Children


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Chronicles 22-24; 1 Thessalonians 3

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 22:5-19

 

In the final few books of 1 Chronicles, we read all about the preparations David made for the building of the temple.  David originally wanted to build the temple himself, but God stopped him.  God had a different plan in mind and wanted David’s son Solomon to build the temple of the Lord.  Before his death, however, David began making the preparations necessary for the job.  He gathered the funds and supplies that would be needed, found the right craftsmen, planned the administration, and took steps to arrange the worship services.  The most important preparation he made, however, was not in laying out the construction or the division of duties.  His most important contribution to the job was the vision for the temple he cast with his son Solomon.  In today’s key verse, David calls his son to him and tells him all about the vision for his life.  In verses 7-10 we read, “David said to Solomon: “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house for the Name of the LORD my God. But this word of the LORD came to me: ‘You have shed much blood and have fought many wars. You are not to build a house for my Name, because you have shed much blood on the earth in my sight. But you will have a son who will be a man of peace and rest, and I will give him rest from all his enemies on every side. His name will be Solomon, and I will grant Israel peace and quiet during his reign. He is the one who will build a house for my Name. He will be my son, and I will be his father. And I will establish the throne of his kingdom over Israel forever.’”  Imagine how memorable this conversation must have been for Solomon, as his father took the time to cast vision to him about God.

One of the most important things we can do as parents is casting vision to our kids about God.  Most of us likely do not have as specific a vision for our children as David did, but we certainly all have a vision to share with them.  It is a vision of loving God with all of their hearts, souls, and minds.  It is a vision of loving their neighbors as themselves.  It is a vision of serving an all-powerful and loving God every day of their lives.  As much as we would like to, we cannot guarantee our children’s salvation.  Each of them must make their own personal choice to accept Jesus Christ as the Lord of their lives.  As parents, though, how we live and what we teach our children can play a HUGE role in how they develop.  The time we spend with them now casting vision, the prayers we pray with them and for them, and the way they see us interacting with others can all help a child grow into a Godly adult.  As we discussed a couple of days ago, we are all called to make disciples.  As parents, that job begins at home.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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God Disciplines with Mercy


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21; Psalm 30; 1 Thessalonians 2

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 21:1-19

 

Once when I was about eight years old or so I was particularly bad and my parents grounded me for two weeks.  During this time, I was not allowed to go outside and play, which in my mind was just about the worst punishment imaginable.  Sometime during this two-week period, my family and I went to my grandmother’s house on a Sunday afternoon to visit her, my aunt and uncle, and my cousins.  I can still remember standing inside my grandmother’s house starting out the window watching my brother and my cousins playing outside.  I was devastated.  All I wanted in the world was to go outside and play, but I knew that I was grounded and I knew better than to ask to go outside.  At some point, though, my father came to me and told me to go outside and play.  I was given a temporary reprieve from my well-deserved punishment for one simple reason – even while being disciplined, my parents still showed mercy.  In today’s key passage, we see that our Father in Heaven does the exact same thing.

David decided to take a census of all of the fighting men in Israel.  Normally, this might not have been a problem, but David wanted the men counted so that he could feel pride in the strength of his army.  Following all of the success he and his men had in war, David was beginning to trust his own military strength more than he trusted God.  Because of David’s sin, God spoke to Gad, David’s seer, and told him to offer David a choice of three different punishments.  David could choose between three years of famine, three months of war, or three days of plague in the land.  Before we continue, let me just point out that this alone was merciful of God.  He did not have to give David a choice about his correction, but He did because of His mercy.  David chose the three days of plague, because it was the one option that was a direct punishment from God.  He told Gad, “Let me fall into the hands of the LORD, for his mercy is very great; but do not let me fall into the hands of men.” (Vs. 13)  Once David had chosen his punishment, God sent a plague that killed 70, 000 men.  In verse 15 we read, “And God sent an angel to destroy Jerusalem. But as the angel was doing so, the LORD saw it and was grieved because of the calamity and said to the angel who was destroying the people, ‘Enough! Withdraw your hand.'”  Even though David sinned against God and deserved to be disciplined, God had mercy on him and the people of Israel.

When we act in sinful ways and we do not repent and turn from that sin, sometimes God has to discipline us.  He does this not to punish us but to correct us and to help us see the error of our ways and return to Him.  If He did not, He would not be a loving and concerned Father.  Just as we discipline our own children for their welfare, so does our heavenly Father lovingly correct His children for their benefit.  One thing that is certain, though, is that even when He has to discipline us, He will still show us mercy.  This perfect mercy of God is just one of the many characteristics that make our God so awesome.  The next time you receive a gentle correction from God, remember his amazing mercy, and praise Him for it.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Chosen by God


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 21-23; 1 Thessalonians 1

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Thessalonians 1:4-10

 

There are a few concepts in Biblical Christianity that can be difficult if not impossible for human beings to fully understand.  There are three concepts that immediately come to mind.  The first is the Trinity.  It is difficult for us to fully comprehend God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit completely one and also completely separate.  Another example is the concept of eternal life in Heaven.  Think for a second about what it will be like to live for eternity.  If you think about it long enough, you will find that your mind will be running in circles because eternity is an idea that our human minds simply cannot fully understand.  The final example that immediately comes to mind is the doctrine of election.  In today’s key passage, Paul writes to the church in Thessalonica, “For we know, brothers loved by God, that he has chosen you” (Vs. 4).   He is telling the Thessalonians that they were chosen by God.  Simply stated, the doctrine of election holds that before the creation of the world, God predestined certain people to be His chosen people.  In Ephesians 1:3-6 we read, “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ. For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. In love he predestined us to be adopted as his sons through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will— to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves.”  It can be difficult for many of us to simultaneously understand the concept of God choosing us and our human responsibility of choosing to follow Him.  It is almost impossible for us to understand how these two seemingly opposite things can both be true at the same time.  Like the other examples above, our minds simply cannot fully understand all of the ways of God.

Now before we get too deep into a discussion of the five points of Calvinism, my point today is to simply ask you to think about one thing.  If you are reading this and have been saved by God’s grace, then you are one of His chosen people.  Before you even existed, God chose you to be one of His children.  He chose you to be saved.  He chose you to live for eternity with Him in Heaven.  How does that make you feel?  When we truly begin to embrace this idea of election, we cannot help but to be simply awestruck by God’s grace.  We cannot help but to feel completely blessed.  We cannot help but to feel totally loved.  We cannot help but to want to obey Him and serve Him.  Think about God’s election of you today, and thank Him for choosing you as one of His children.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Jesus Gives the Great Commission


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 19,20; Psalm 55; Matthew 28

Today’s Key Passage – Matthew 28:16-20

 

Following Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection, he spent time with His disciples here on earth.  Right before He left this world and returned to the right hand of the Father, He left the disciples with a parting command.  Most followers of Christ have heard of the Great Commission, and most of them can even paraphrase the verse if not quote it verbatim.  Interestingly, though, for some Christians there seems to be some confusion as to what Jesus really commanded us to do.  In verses 19 and 20 of today’s key passage, Jesus said, “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.”  It sounds fairly straightforward, but there is a slight problem.  Many times, as followers of Christ it can become easy for us to start focusing on the wrong word.  We tend to focus on “Go”.  We spend our time “going”, trying to do things for Christ.  We try to “go” to show our love for Him.  We think that “go” is the verb in Jesus’ sentence, but in the sentence, “Go and make disciples of all nations”; the word “go” is not the verb.  This is not the action Jesus is calling us to do.  The verb in the sentence is “make”.  The action Jesus is calling each and every follower of Christ to do is to make disciples.

What does it mean to make a disciple?  Does it mean leading people to Jesus?  Absolutely.  But it also means a lot more than that.  When Jesus first called the twelve disciples, He did not simply introduce Himself to them and then walk away leaving them to fend for themselves.  He did not tell them everything about Himself and then release them out into the world on their own.  What Jesus did was He walked with them.  He met with them regularly.  He answered their questions.  He taught them more about God.  He showed them the path they should follow, and then He took them down that path Himself.  This is how He made them disciples.  When we read the Great Commission, and we begin to focus on the real goal of making disciples, what better example do we have to follow than the example set forth by our Lord?  Introducing a lost soul to Jesus Christ is great.  Answering his or her questions about Christ is wonderful.  Leading them to salvation is awesome.  But to truly make a disciple, we have to keep going – we have to walk with that person.

There are three more quick points I would like to share about today’s key passage.  First, keep in mind that this is the Great Commission, not the Great Suggestion.  Making disciples is not optional.  This is a command to every one of us who call Jesus our Lord and Savior.  Secondly, Jesus told us to make disciples of “all” nations.  We are not to pick and choose who gets to hear about Jesus or who gets to come to Him.  The homeless man or the ex-prostitute who walks into the church should be greeted with joy and thanksgiving and we should do everything we can to make them disciples.  Finally, Jesus commanded that we teach others to “obey everything I have commanded”.  Just as we are not to pick and choose who can come to Christ, we cannot pick and choose which parts of Jesus message we should be teaching others to follow.  Many times, it can be easy to preach a “health and wealth” message, and leave out the parts about carrying our cross daily or dealing with persecution.  Teach others everything Jesus commanded, not just the things we think they will want to hear.

My prayer today is that each one of you reading this will take some time out of your busy day to stop and think about the Great Commission.  How are you doing with it?  Are you focusing on the right words?  Are you making disciples?

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Pilate Washes His Hands of Jesus


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 18; Psalm 56; Matthew 27

Today’s Key Passage – Matthew 27:11-26

 

In 1818, Ignaz Phillip Semmelweis was born into a world of dying women.  The finest hospitals in the world lost one out of six young mothers to the scourge of “childbed fever.”  A doctor’s daily routine began in the dissecting room where he performed autopsies.  From there, he made his way to the hospital to examine expectant mothers without ever pausing to wash his hands.  Dr. Semmelweis was the first man in history to associate such examinations with the resultant infection and death of the new mothers.  His own practice was to wash with a chlorine solution, and after eleven years and the delivery of 8,537 babies, he lost only 184 mothers–about one in fifty.  Though none of his colleagues believed him at the time, we know today about the importance of washing our hands.  In today’s key passage however, we see a different kind of hand washing.  The religious leaders were calling for Jesus execution, and Pilate was feeling the pressure.  He knew what he should do.  His own conscience told him that Jesus was not guilty of anything, and his wife confirmed his suspicions, but Pilate knew that if he released Jesus he would have a possible revolt on his hands that could cost him his job.  Since he could not come up with a solution that would make everyone happy, he decided to make no decision at all.  We read in verse 24, “When Pilate saw that he was getting nowhere, but that instead an uproar was starting, he took water and washed his hands in front of the crowd. ‘I am innocent of this man’s blood,’ he said. ‘“It is your responsibility!'”  Pilate wanted to simply walk away from the decision and not take responsibility for the outcome, but in the end, he still allowed Jesus to be crucified.  In the end, he was still guilty.

There are many times when we can all feel tempted to simply “wash our hands” of a situation.  When we see people who do not know Jesus Christ as their personal Lord and Savior, we may be tempted to not deal with the question of who He is.  When we see temptations in our lives that may lead us to sin, it is often too difficult to cut those temptations out of our lives completely.  When we see other believers sinning, it is often easier to stay quiet instead of correcting them in love.  When we see someone in need, it is often easier to walk by him instead of stopping to help.  I could fill this page and probably a couple more simply listing out examples of when we might be tempted to “wash our hands” of a situation instead of dealing with it, but the point is that in each of these examples there is one common truth – washing our hands does not make us innocent.  Walking away and choosing not to deal with a problem does not solve it, and in the eyes of God, we will still be found guilty.  When you are tempted to wash your hands of a situation, instead ask God for His guidance.  Allow Him to lead you to the right answer.  Allow Him to lead you down the right path.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Mary Anoints Jesus with Perfume


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 17; Psalm 71; Matthew 26

Today’s Key Passage – Matthew 26:6-13

 

In today’s key passage, we find the story of Mary of Bethany.  Mary actually has three different stories in the New Testament.  The first story is found in Luke 10:38-42 when Jesus visits her home.  While her sister Martha spends her time running around trying to serve Jesus, Mary sits at Jesus’ feet and listens to every word He has to say.  We see Mary again in John 11:1-44 when her brother Lazarus dies and Jesus resurrects him.  Her final story is found today in our passage, which is also located in Mark 14:3-9 and John 12:1-11.  Jesus is only days away from His crucifixion, and he stops at the home of Simon the Leper in Bethany.  While in this home, Mary came to Jesus with a very expensive jar of perfume and poured it over his head as He was reclining at a table.  In John’s account of this story, she also poured the perfume on Jesus’ feet and washed them with her hair.  (Please note that this is not the same event found in Luke 7:36-50 in which a sinful woman anoints Jesus’ feet.  This is a separate, although fairly similar event, and should not be confused with Mary’s story found in today’s passage.)  The disciples were not happy about Mary pouring this perfume on Jesus, as it was very expensive.  In fact, the disciples point out that the perfume could have been sold for a year’s wages and the money could have been given to the poor.  Jesus, however, was pleased with Mary’s gesture, and said, “Why are you bothering this woman? She has done a beautiful thing to me. The poor you will always have with you, but you will not always have me. When she poured this perfume on my body, she did it to prepare me for burial. I tell you the truth, wherever this gospel is preached throughout the world, what she has done will also be told, in memory of her.”(Vss 10-13)

I think we can learn a lot from Mary’s story.  Mary knew that there was a time and a place to worship Jesus, regardless of the cost.  She did not seem to care that the perfume was costly.  She did not seem to care that the disciples would criticize her sacrifice.  The only thing she cared about was spending time worshiping Jesus, and she worshiped Him in the best way she knew.  Like Mary, it is important that we take the time to stop everything and worship Jesus.  We should spend our time with Him in prayer, and we should spend our time reading God’s Word.  For many of us, this might prove to be costly.  To really spend time with Jesus on a daily basis, we might have to get up early or stay up late.  We might have to spend our lunch break with Him instead of going out to lunch with the group from the office.  We might have to skip watching our favorite television show to make time to spend with Jesus.  There might be many things we need to sacrifice to make a time to worship Him, but all of these sacrifices are well worth it.  Though the disciples seemed to disagree at first, Jesus confirmed that Mary had her priorities straight.  When it comes to worshiping Jesus and spending time with Him, it is important that we have our priorities straight as well.  Do not allow anything to keep you from spending time worshiping Him daily.  As we spend more time with Jesus, we will continue to grow and mature in our faith, and we will find that we are better able to serve Him in all that we do.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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What God Wants


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 15,16; Psalm 32; Matthew 25

Today’s Key Passage – Psalm 32

 

Most of us spend a lot of time thinking about “wants”.  We think about what we want to eat for dinner.  We think about what our children want for their birthdays or Christmas.  We think about where our spouses want to go on vacation.  A better “want” to consider, however, is what God wants.  The Bible helps us answer this question in many different ways.  We know that He wants us to love Him.  We know that He wants us to put Him first.  In today’s key passage, we find more clues as to what God wants.  Let us look at a few of those “wants” today:

  • God wants us to be cleansed – (Vss. 1-2) – God wants each of us to receive the initial cleansing that comes from the salvation offered through Jesus Christ.  In addition, he wants us to be continually cleansed by Him as we live our lives daily.
  • God wants us to be convicted – (Vss. 3-4) – The Holy Spirit living in us convicts us of sins as they happen.  When we sin, God will convict us and show us that we need to turn back to Him to restore our relationship.  This conviction will not let us rest until we have dealt with our sin.
  • God wants us to confess – (Vss. 5-6) – When we acknowledge our sins to God, He forgives us and cleanses us from our impurities.
  • God wants us to rest in His protection– (Vs. 7) – God wants to be our “hiding place” from all of the troubles of this world.  When we rest in Him, he will shield us from evil.
  • God wants us to rest in His guidance – (Vs. 8) – God wants to instruct us and teach us how to walk in His ways.  He wants us to trust Him to lead us only to what is best for us.
  • God wants us to cooperate – (Vss. 9-11) – Some people in this world are stubborn.  Rather than allowing God to guide them with love, they leave God no other choice but to lead them with “bit and bridle”.  In other words, they force God to lead them using discipline and punishment.  When we fail to acknowledge our sins before God, He may punish us to force us back to Him.  God will use any means necessary to restore our relationship with Him.

As I read today’s passage, I am awestruck by the differences between God and man.  Obviously, human beings are very different from God in many ways, but I believe one of the biggest differences comes in the area of forgiveness.  When humans forgive others, we sometimes do it almost grudgingly.  We know we “should” forgive someone, or we feel like we “need to” forgive someone.  Sometimes we even feel like we “have to” forgive someone.  When we do forgive, we very seldom ever forget.  God, on the other hand, is not like us in this regard.  God never feels like He should forgive, or that He needs to forgive, and he certainly never feels like He has to forgive.  God wants to forgive us.  In addition, when He forgives, He forgets completely that we have sinned.  We do not have this ability on our own, but God does.  He does not keep a record of wrongs.  When God forgives us, we are washed clean in the blood of Christ and are made white as snow, and our relationship to God is completely restored.  We do not have to live with guilt over sin.  We do not have to live in fear of His punishments.  We can find freedom and joy today through the forgiveness He offers us.  The next time you are thinking about “wants” in your life, consider what God wants for you.  Think of this Psalm, and rest in His promises.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Remaining Watchful for Jesus’ Return


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 13, 14; Matthew 24

Today’s Key Passage – Matthew 24:36-51

 

Have you ever sold a house?  If you have, you know that the process can be challenging, particularly when it comes to showing your house to perspective buyers.  One of the ways you can go about this is to schedule an open house.  Using this method, the homeowner can choose a date and time when buyers can come and look at the house at their own pace.  An open house is a good option for many homeowners because it is a scheduled event.  The owner has time to clean the house and make sure it looks its best.  He or she can ensure that all of the furniture is in order, that the kids’ toys are put away, and that the closets are clean.  Not all perspective buyers, however, view a home during an open house.  More often than not, buyers view the house on their own schedule with the help of a real estate agent.  When this happens, the homeowner can get very little warning that someone is coming to view the house, so they have to make sure the house is always in order.  This is one of the things that make listing a house for sale so challenging, because you always have to be prepared for a buyer to walk in at any moment.  In today’s key passage, we learn that Jesus return will occur in much the same way.

The disciples asked Jesus when he would return to the world at the end of the age.  Like a homeowner scheduling an open house, the disciples wanted to know exactly when this event would occur so that they would be able to prepare.  Jesus, however, would not give them an exact date or time for His return.  Instead, he told them to remain watchful.  Like an owner with a house on the market, Jesus wanted the disciples (and us) to always be prepared for His coming.  Jesus reminded the disciples about how the world was in the days of Noah.  People were living their lives and going about their normal routines never knowing that a great flood was coming to wash them all away.  Noah, of course, knew all about the flood and he spent a great deal of time getting prepared.  He built the ark and filled it with animals in preparation for God’s coming judgment, while everyone else lived their lives oblivious to the event until the rains actually started.  When the rains did come, no one had any time to make any last minute preparations to try to save themselves.  Because they had not prepared, they were lost to the flood.  Likewise, when Jesus returns on that great day of judgment, no one will have any opportunity for last minute preparations.  He will come “at an hour when you do not expect Him.” (Vs. 44)

People today still try to predict when Jesus will return, but the simple fact is that no one really knows for sure.  Unlike the people in Noah’s day who had no idea that a flood was coming, though, we do know for a fact that Jesus will return.  We know from Scripture that there will be a day of judgment for every person in this world.  While we do not know when that will happen, we do know how to prepare.  We can live every day as if it were “that day”.  We can choose to turn to Him now.  We can choose to follow Him now.  We can choose to walk in His ways and live our lives for Him now.  When we do that, we never have to be worried about being caught off-guard by His return.  When we remain watchful every day, we will always be prepared.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

The Snowball Effect of Sin


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Admitting When You’re Wrong


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 20; Psalm 20; Matthew 22

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 10:1-19

 

There are many popular phrases in the English language.  “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”  “The ball is in your court.”  “Do not put all of your eggs in one basket.”  Most people have heard these phrases (and countless others) often, and even use them in their own communication from time to time.  As I was reading today’s key passage, I began thinking about two other phrases that seem to be a lot less popular these days.  You do not hear them very often, but when you do, they can have a big impact.  In fact, it is hard for me to think of any other phrases that can mean as much to the health and wellbeing of our relationships with other people.  What are these two phrases?  They are “I was wrong” and “I am sorry”.

In today’s key passage, we read that the king of the Ammonites died and his son Hanun succeeded him.  David wanted to show kindness to Hanun, so he sent a delegation to express his sympathy to Hanun concerning his father.  When the delegation arrived, the Ammonite nobles wrongly believed that they were sent by David to spy on the land in advance of an attack.  Hanun believed his nobles and seized David’s men, shaved their beards, and cut their garments to humiliate them.  When Hanun realized that David was angry over this situation, he could have admitted he was wrong.  He could have apologized to David and his men and tried to keep the peace.  Instead, Hanun gathered his troops to go to war with David.  In the end, David and his army (with the help of God of course) annihilated Hanun and the Ammonites.

When we realize we are wrong, how we react will often define our character.  When pride sets in, it can become difficult to admit our mistakes or apologize, and because of this, the most common reaction for many people is to respond angrily or defensively.  Most of the time, though, this only serves to escalate the problem and further fracture our already fragile relationships.  As we get closer and closer to God, He will help us in this area.  He will help us recognize our mistakes sooner, He will help us admit when we are wrong, and He will help us to apologize.  Romans 12:18 reminds us, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”  The next time you realize you are in the wrong, do not react like Hanun.  There is no shame in saying “I was wrong”.  There is nothing wrong with saying “I am sorry”.  Learn to use these phrases, and learn to live at peace with everyone.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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