Category Archives: 10 – 2 Samuel

The Snowball Effect of Sin


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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Admitting When You’re Wrong


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 20; Psalm 20; Matthew 22

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 10:1-19

 

There are many popular phrases in the English language.  “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”  “The ball is in your court.”  “Do not put all of your eggs in one basket.”  Most people have heard these phrases (and countless others) often, and even use them in their own communication from time to time.  As I was reading today’s key passage, I began thinking about two other phrases that seem to be a lot less popular these days.  You do not hear them very often, but when you do, they can have a big impact.  In fact, it is hard for me to think of any other phrases that can mean as much to the health and wellbeing of our relationships with other people.  What are these two phrases?  They are “I was wrong” and “I am sorry”.

In today’s key passage, we read that the king of the Ammonites died and his son Hanun succeeded him.  David wanted to show kindness to Hanun, so he sent a delegation to express his sympathy to Hanun concerning his father.  When the delegation arrived, the Ammonite nobles wrongly believed that they were sent by David to spy on the land in advance of an attack.  Hanun believed his nobles and seized David’s men, shaved their beards, and cut their garments to humiliate them.  When Hanun realized that David was angry over this situation, he could have admitted he was wrong.  He could have apologized to David and his men and tried to keep the peace.  Instead, Hanun gathered his troops to go to war with David.  In the end, David and his army (with the help of God of course) annihilated Hanun and the Ammonites.

When we realize we are wrong, how we react will often define our character.  When pride sets in, it can become difficult to admit our mistakes or apologize, and because of this, the most common reaction for many people is to respond angrily or defensively.  Most of the time, though, this only serves to escalate the problem and further fracture our already fragile relationships.  As we get closer and closer to God, He will help us in this area.  He will help us recognize our mistakes sooner, He will help us admit when we are wrong, and He will help us to apologize.  Romans 12:18 reminds us, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”  The next time you realize you are in the wrong, do not react like Hanun.  There is no shame in saying “I was wrong”.  There is nothing wrong with saying “I am sorry”.  Learn to use these phrases, and learn to live at peace with everyone.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

A Lesser-Known Person, a Very Familiar Story


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 8,9; 1 Chronicles 18,19; Matthew 21

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 9:1-13

 

I would like to begin today with a pop quiz.  What do you know about Mephibosheth?  If you are anything like me, you might not know a lot about this lesser-known person in the Old Testament.  I must admit that I tend to get bogged down with a lot of the names in the OT, so if someone were to ask me that question prior to today I likely would have had to consult my good friend Google.  In fact, before today the one thing I could definitively say about Mephibosheth is that spell-check does not recognize his name as a word.  Even if you have never heard of Mephibosheth, I can promise that you are going to enjoy his story.  Why?  Because despite the fact that you may not recognize his name, you have heard this story a million times.

Mephibosheth was the son of Jonathan and the grandson of King Saul.  We first hear about him in 2 Samuel 4:4 when he was five years old.  When word came that Saul and Jonathan had been killed, his nurse picked him up to flee but as she did Mephibosheth fell and was crippled in both feet.  In today’s key passage, we see him again as a grown man.  As the descendant of a former king, Mephibosheth did not have much of a life.  He was separated from the new king and the kingdom.  He remained in hiding, for fear that King David might want to destroy anyone who had a claim to the throne, but David wanted to show kindness to one of Saul’s descendants and sought out Mephibosheth.  When Mephibosheth was brought before David, he was terrified, not knowing what was going to happen to him.  To his relief, Mephibosheth was saved from his miserable life by David and was given his inheritance.  He did nothing to earn it – it was granted to him freely. All he had to do was accept David’s kindness.  David treated Mephibosheth as a son, allowing him to eat with the other sons at the King’s table.

Do you recognize the story?  Does it sound familiar?  Just as Mephibosheth was separated from the kingdom, today every person on this earth is born separated from God by sin.  Fortunately, God seeks us out and wants to show kindness to us through his grace and mercy.  More often than not, at first we are afraid to come to God.  We do not know exactly what will happen or if we will even be welcomed, but God welcomes us with open arms.  We are saved from a miserable life and given an inheritance in Heaven when we accept God’s free gift of salvation.  The price for sin has been paid by the blood of Jesus Christ.  All we must do is accept God’s free gift through faith in His Son.  When we do, we are treated like sons and daughters, and we are given a seat at God’s table for eternity.

If you already knew the story of Mephibosheth, my hat is off to you.  If you did not know it, now you do.  Perhaps you know others who do not know the story.  Perhaps you have friends, neighbors, or colleagues who have never heard it.  Share the story of Mephibosheth and ultimately the story of God’s free gift of salvation with someone today.  You just might save a life.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

The Snowball Effect of Sin


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Admitting When You’re Wrong


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 20; Psalm 20; Matthew 22

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 10:1-19

 

There are many popular phrases in the English language.  “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”  “The ball is in your court.”  “Do not put all of your eggs in one basket.”  Most people have heard these phrases (and countless others) often, and even use them in their own communication from time to time.  As I was reading today’s key passage, I began thinking about two other phrases that seem to be a lot less popular these days.  You do not hear them very often, but when you do, they can have a big impact.  In fact, it is hard for me to think of any other phrases that can mean as much to the health and wellbeing of our relationships with other people.  What are these two phrases?  They are “I was wrong” and “I am sorry”.

In today’s key passage, we read that the king of the Ammonites died and his son Hanun succeeded him.  David wanted to show kindness to Hanun, so he sent a delegation to express his sympathy to Hanun concerning his father.  When the delegation arrived, the Ammonite nobles wrongly believed that they were sent by David to spy on the land in advance of an attack.  Hanun believed his nobles and seized David’s men, shaved their beards, and cut their garments to humiliate them.  When Hanun realized that David was angry over this situation, he could have admitted he was wrong.  He could have apologized to David and his men and tried to keep the peace.  Instead, Hanun gathered his troops to go to war with David.  In the end, David and his army (with the help of God of course) annihilated Hanun and the Ammonites.

When we realize we are wrong, how we react will often define our character.  When pride sets in, it can become difficult to admit our mistakes or apologize, and because of this, the most common reaction for many people is to respond angrily or defensively.  Most of the time, though, this only serves to escalate the problem and further fracture our already fragile relationships.  As we get closer and closer to God, He will help us in this area.  He will help us recognize our mistakes sooner, He will help us admit when we are wrong, and He will help us to apologize.  Romans 12:18 reminds us, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”  The next time you realize you are in the wrong, do not react like Hanun.  There is no shame in saying “I was wrong”.  There is nothing wrong with saying “I am sorry”.  Learn to use these phrases, and learn to live at peace with everyone.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

A Lesser-Known Person, a Very Familiar Story


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 8,9; 1 Chronicles 18,19; Matthew 21

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 9:1-13

 

I would like to begin today with a pop quiz.  What do you know about Mephibosheth?  If you are anything like me, you might not know a lot about this lesser-known person in the Old Testament.  I must admit that I tend to get bogged down with a lot of the names in the OT, so if someone were to ask me that question prior to today I likely would have had to consult my good friend Google.  In fact, before today the one thing I could definitively say about Mephibosheth is that spell-check does not recognize his name as a word.  Even if you have never heard of Mephibosheth, I can promise that you are going to enjoy his story.  Why?  Because despite the fact that you may not recognize his name, you have heard this story a million times.

Mephibosheth was the son of Jonathan and the grandson of King Saul.  We first hear about him in 2 Samuel 4:4 when he was five years old.  When word came that Saul and Jonathan had been killed, his nurse picked him up to flee but as she did Mephibosheth fell and was crippled in both feet.  In today’s key passage, we see him again as a grown man.  As the descendant of a former king, Mephibosheth did not have much of a life.  He was separated from the new king and the kingdom.  He remained in hiding, for fear that King David might want to destroy anyone who had a claim to the throne, but David wanted to show kindness to one of Saul’s descendants and sought out Mephibosheth.  When Mephibosheth was brought before David, he was terrified, not knowing what was going to happen to him.  To his relief, Mephibosheth was saved from his miserable life by David and was given his inheritance.  He did nothing to earn it – it was granted to him freely. All he had to do was accept David’s kindness.  David treated Mephibosheth as a son, allowing him to eat with the other sons at the King’s table.

Do you recognize the story?  Does it sound familiar?  Just as Mephibosheth was separated from the kingdom, today every person on this earth is born separated from God by sin.  Fortunately, God seeks us out and wants to show kindness to us through his grace and mercy.  More often than not, at first we are afraid to come to God.  We do not know exactly what will happen or if we will even be welcomed, but God welcomes us with open arms.  We are saved from a miserable life and given an inheritance in Heaven when we accept God’s free gift of salvation.  The price for sin has been paid by the blood of Jesus Christ.  All we must do is accept God’s free gift through faith in His Son.  When we do, we are treated like sons and daughters, and we are given a seat at God’s table for eternity.

If you already knew the story of Mephibosheth, my hat is off to you.  If you did not know it, now you do.  Perhaps you know others who do not know the story.  Perhaps you have friends, neighbors, or colleagues who have never heard it.  Share the story of Mephibosheth and ultimately the story of God’s free gift of salvation with someone today.  You just might save a life.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

The Snowball Effect of Sin


 

Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

 

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Admitting When You’re Wrong


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 20; Psalm 20; Matthew 22

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 10:1-19

 

There are many popular phrases in the English language.  “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”  “The ball is in your court.”  “Do not put all of your eggs in one basket.”  Most people have heard these phrases (and countless others) often, and even use them in their own communication from time to time.  As I was reading today’s key passage, I began thinking about two other phrases that seem to be a lot less popular these days.  You do not hear them very often, but when you do, they can have a big impact.  In fact, it is hard for me to think of any other phrases that can mean as much to the health and wellbeing of our relationships with other people.  What are these two phrases?  They are “I was wrong” and “I am sorry”.

In today’s key passage, we read that the king of the Ammonites died and his son Hanun succeeded him.  David wanted to show kindness to Hanun, so he sent a delegation to express his sympathy to Hanun concerning his father.  When the delegation arrived, the Ammonite nobles wrongly believed that they were sent by David to spy on the land in advance of an attack.  Hanun believed his nobles and seized David’s men, shaved their beards, and cut their garments to humiliate them.  When Hanun realized that David was angry over this situation, he could have admitted he was wrong.  He could have apologized to David and his men and tried to keep the peace.  Instead, Hanun gathered his troops to go to war with David.  In the end, David and his army (with the help of God of course) annihilated Hanun and the Ammonites.

When we realize we are wrong, how we react will often define our character.  When pride sets in, it can become difficult to admit our mistakes or apologize, and because of this, the most common reaction for many people is to respond angrily or defensively.  Most of the time, though, this only serves to escalate the problem and further fracture our already fragile relationships.  As we get closer and closer to God, He will help us in this area.  He will help us recognize our mistakes sooner, He will help us admit when we are wrong, and He will help us to apologize.  Romans 12:18 reminds us, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”  The next time you realize you are in the wrong, do not react like Hanun.  There is no shame in saying “I was wrong”.  There is nothing wrong with saying “I am sorry”.  Learn to use these phrases, and learn to live at peace with everyone.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

A Lesser-Known Person, a Very Familiar Story


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 8,9; 1 Chronicles 18,19; Matthew 21

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 9:1-13

 

I would like to begin today with a pop quiz.  What do you know about Mephibosheth?  If you are anything like me, you might not know a lot about this lesser-known person in the Old Testament.  I must admit that I tend to get bogged down with a lot of the names in the OT, so if someone were to ask me that question prior to today I likely would have had to consult my good friend Google.  In fact, before today the one thing I could definitively say about Mephibosheth is that spell-check does not recognize his name as a word.  Even if you have never heard of Mephibosheth, I can promise that you are going to enjoy his story.  Why?  Because despite the fact that you may not recognize his name, you have heard this story a million times.

Mephibosheth was the son of Jonathan and the grandson of King Saul.  We first hear about him in 2 Samuel 4:4 when he was five years old.  When word came that Saul and Jonathan had been killed, his nurse picked him up to flee but as she did Mephibosheth fell and was crippled in both feet.  In today’s key passage, we see him again as a grown man.  As the descendant of a former king, Mephibosheth did not have much of a life.  He was separated from the new king and the kingdom.  He remained in hiding, for fear that King David might want to destroy anyone who had a claim to the throne, but David wanted to show kindness to one of Saul’s descendants and sought out Mephibosheth.  When Mephibosheth was brought before David, he was terrified, not knowing what was going to happen to him.  To his relief, Mephibosheth was saved from his miserable life by David and was given his inheritance.  He did nothing to earn it – it was granted to him freely. All he had to do was accept David’s kindness.  David treated Mephibosheth as a son, allowing him to eat with the other sons at the King’s table.

Do you recognize the story?  Does it sound familiar?  Just as Mephibosheth was separated from the kingdom, today every person on this earth is born separated from God by sin.  Fortunately, God seeks us out and wants to show kindness to us through his grace and mercy.  More often than not, at first we are afraid to come to God.  We do not know exactly what will happen or if we will even be welcomed, but God welcomes us with open arms.  We are saved from a miserable life and given an inheritance in Heaven when we accept God’s free gift of salvation.  The price for sin has been paid by the blood of Jesus Christ.  All we must do is accept God’s free gift through faith in His Son.  When we do, we are treated like sons and daughters, and we are given a seat at God’s table for eternity.

If you already knew the story of Mephibosheth, my hat is off to you.  If you did not know it, now you do.  Perhaps you know others who do not know the story.  Perhaps you have friends, neighbors, or colleagues who have never heard it.  Share the story of Mephibosheth and ultimately the story of God’s free gift of salvation with someone today.  You just might save a life.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

The Snowball Effect of Sin


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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