Category Archives: 13 – 1 Chronicles

Casting Vision to our Children


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Chronicles 22-24; 1 Thessalonians 3

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 22:5-19

 

In the final few books of 1 Chronicles, we read all about the preparations David made for the building of the temple.  David originally wanted to build the temple himself, but God stopped him.  God had a different plan in mind and wanted David’s son Solomon to build the temple of the Lord.  Before his death, however, David began making the preparations necessary for the job.  He gathered the funds and supplies that would be needed, found the right craftsmen, planned the administration, and took steps to arrange the worship services.  The most important preparation he made, however, was not in laying out the construction or the division of duties.  His most important contribution to the job was the vision for the temple he cast with his son Solomon.  In today’s key verse, David calls his son to him and tells him all about the vision for his life.  In verses 7-10 we read, “David said to Solomon: “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house for the Name of the LORD my God. But this word of the LORD came to me: ‘You have shed much blood and have fought many wars. You are not to build a house for my Name, because you have shed much blood on the earth in my sight. But you will have a son who will be a man of peace and rest, and I will give him rest from all his enemies on every side. His name will be Solomon, and I will grant Israel peace and quiet during his reign. He is the one who will build a house for my Name. He will be my son, and I will be his father. And I will establish the throne of his kingdom over Israel forever.’”  Imagine how memorable this conversation must have been for Solomon, as his father took the time to cast vision to him about God.

One of the most important things we can do as parents is casting vision to our kids about God.  Most of us likely do not have as specific a vision for our children as David did, but we certainly all have a vision to share with them.  It is a vision of loving God with all of their hearts, souls, and minds.  It is a vision of loving their neighbors as themselves.  It is a vision of serving an all-powerful and loving God every day of their lives.  As much as we would like to, we cannot guarantee our children’s salvation.  Each of them must make their own personal choice to accept Jesus Christ as the Lord of their lives.  As parents, though, how we live and what we teach our children can play a HUGE role in how they develop.  The time we spend with them now casting vision, the prayers we pray with them and for them, and the way they see us interacting with others can all help a child grow into a Godly adult.  As we discussed a couple of days ago, we are all called to make disciples.  As parents, that job begins at home.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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God Disciplines with Mercy


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21; Psalm 30; 1 Thessalonians 2

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 21:1-19

 

Once when I was about eight years old or so I was particularly bad and my parents grounded me for two weeks.  During this time, I was not allowed to go outside and play, which in my mind was just about the worst punishment imaginable.  Sometime during this two-week period, my family and I went to my grandmother’s house on a Sunday afternoon to visit her, my aunt and uncle, and my cousins.  I can still remember standing inside my grandmother’s house starting out the window watching my brother and my cousins playing outside.  I was devastated.  All I wanted in the world was to go outside and play, but I knew that I was grounded and I knew better than to ask to go outside.  At some point, though, my father came to me and told me to go outside and play.  I was given a temporary reprieve from my well-deserved punishment for one simple reason – even while being disciplined, my parents still showed mercy.  In today’s key passage, we see that our Father in Heaven does the exact same thing.

David decided to take a census of all of the fighting men in Israel.  Normally, this might not have been a problem, but David wanted the men counted so that he could feel pride in the strength of his army.  Following all of the success he and his men had in war, David was beginning to trust his own military strength more than he trusted God.  Because of David’s sin, God spoke to Gad, David’s seer, and told him to offer David a choice of three different punishments.  David could choose between three years of famine, three months of war, or three days of plague in the land.  Before we continue, let me just point out that this alone was merciful of God.  He did not have to give David a choice about his correction, but He did because of His mercy.  David chose the three days of plague, because it was the one option that was a direct punishment from God.  He told Gad, “Let me fall into the hands of the LORD, for his mercy is very great; but do not let me fall into the hands of men.” (Vs. 13)  Once David had chosen his punishment, God sent a plague that killed 70, 000 men.  In verse 15 we read, “And God sent an angel to destroy Jerusalem. But as the angel was doing so, the LORD saw it and was grieved because of the calamity and said to the angel who was destroying the people, ‘Enough! Withdraw your hand.'”  Even though David sinned against God and deserved to be disciplined, God had mercy on him and the people of Israel.

When we act in sinful ways and we do not repent and turn from that sin, sometimes God has to discipline us.  He does this not to punish us but to correct us and to help us see the error of our ways and return to Him.  If He did not, He would not be a loving and concerned Father.  Just as we discipline our own children for their welfare, so does our heavenly Father lovingly correct His children for their benefit.  One thing that is certain, though, is that even when He has to discipline us, He will still show us mercy.  This perfect mercy of God is just one of the many characteristics that make our God so awesome.  The next time you receive a gentle correction from God, remember his amazing mercy, and praise Him for it.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Good Intentions


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 6; 1 Chronicles 13; Psalm 68; Matthew 17

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 13:1-14

 

I read a story the other day about a man who wanted to get his children goldfish.  He went to the pet store but found that aquariums are fairly expensive, so instead he found a used, dirty aquarium and purchased it for five dollars.  He took the aquarium home, cleaned it up, and made it look like new before adding four new goldfish to his children’s delight.  Sadly though, over the course of the next two days three of the four goldfish died.  He called the pet store to find out what was wrong, and he quickly realized his mistake.  He cleaned the aquarium with soap, which turned out to be toxic to the fish.  The man had the right intentions, but when he acted on his intentions, he did not do it in the right way, which led to the death of the goldfish.  In today’s key passage, we see a similar story of good intentions producing disastrous results.

For years the Ark of the Covenant was kept at a man named Abinadab’s house following its capture and return by the Philistines.  Now that David was finally king, he wanted to bring the ark back to Jerusalem, so he conferred with his officers and went with a small army to retrieve it.  When they reached the ark, they placed it on a new cart pulled by oxen and started the journey back to Jerusalem.  At one point, the oxen stumbled and a man named Uzzah reached out and touched the ark to steady it and keep it from falling off the cart.  In verse 10 we read, “The LORD’s anger burned against Uzzah, and he struck him down because he had put his hand on the ark. So he died there before God.”  Upon first reading this, it may seem like a pretty stiff punishment from God, but we need to understand a few things.  First, God provided strict instructions from the beginning that the ark should only be moved by the Levites (priests) using poles that held the ark by rings on the sides, and non-Levites should never touch the ark itself.  David and his group did not follow these instructions and instead transported the ark on a cart in the same way the Philistines transported the ark years earlier.  Secondly, we must realize that God is perfectly just and he cannot tolerate sin.  While David had good intentions in bringing the ark back to Jerusalem, he went about it the wrong way and sinned.  In addition, while Uzzah had good intentions in steadying the ark, he went about it the wrong way and sinned.  While God’s punishment of these sins may be hard for us to read about, we always have to keep in mind that as much as God loves us he is still perfectly just and severely punishes sin.

Both of these illustrations teach us a valuable lesson about intentions.  Having good intentions is important, but intentions alone are not enough.  We must act on our intentions, and we must act in the right way.  The best way to ensure we are acting in the right way is to seek guidance before we ever begin.  If the father in the story above sought guidance before cleaning the aquarium, he would not have used soap and would not have killed the goldfish.  If David sought God’s guidance before transporting the ark, he would not have used a cart and non-Levites and would not have killed Uzzah.  Seek to know God’s will before you act on good intentions and you can avoid disastrous results.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Casting Vision to our Children


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Chronicles 22-24; 1 Thessalonians 3

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 22:5-19

 

In the final few books of 1 Chronicles, we read all about the preparations David made for the building of the temple.  David originally wanted to build the temple himself, but God stopped him.  God had a different plan in mind and wanted David’s son Solomon to build the temple of the Lord.  Before his death, however, David began making the preparations necessary for the job.  He gathered the funds and supplies that would be needed, found the right craftsmen, planned the administration, and took steps to arrange the worship services.  The most important preparation he made, however, was not in laying out the construction or the division of duties.  His most important contribution to the job was the vision for the temple he cast with his son Solomon.  In today’s key verse, David calls his son to him and tells him all about the vision for his life.  In verses 7-10 we read, “David said to Solomon: “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house for the Name of the LORD my God. But this word of the LORD came to me: ‘You have shed much blood and have fought many wars. You are not to build a house for my Name, because you have shed much blood on the earth in my sight. But you will have a son who will be a man of peace and rest, and I will give him rest from all his enemies on every side. His name will be Solomon, and I will grant Israel peace and quiet during his reign. He is the one who will build a house for my Name. He will be my son, and I will be his father. And I will establish the throne of his kingdom over Israel forever.’”  Imagine how memorable this conversation must have been for Solomon, as his father took the time to cast vision to him about God.

One of the most important things we can do as parents is casting vision to our kids about God.  Most of us likely do not have as specific a vision for our children as David did, but we certainly all have a vision to share with them.  It is a vision of loving God with all of their hearts, souls, and minds.  It is a vision of loving their neighbors as themselves.  It is a vision of serving an all-powerful and loving God every day of their lives.  As much as we would like to, we cannot guarantee our children’s salvation.  Each of them must make their own personal choice to accept Jesus Christ as the Lord of their lives.  As parents, though, how we live and what we teach our children can play a HUGE role in how they develop.  The time we spend with them now casting vision, the prayers we pray with them and for them, and the way they see us interacting with others can all help a child grow into a Godly adult.  As we discussed a couple of days ago, we are all called to make disciples.  As parents, that job begins at home.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

God Disciplines with Mercy


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21; Psalm 30; 1 Thessalonians 2

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 21:1-19

 

Once when I was about eight years old or so I was particularly bad and my parents grounded me for two weeks.  During this time, I was not allowed to go outside and play, which in my mind was just about the worst punishment imaginable.  Sometime during this two-week period, my family and I went to my grandmother’s house on a Sunday afternoon to visit her, my aunt and uncle, and my cousins.  I can still remember standing inside my grandmother’s house starting out the window watching my brother and my cousins playing outside.  I was devastated.  All I wanted in the world was to go outside and play, but I knew that I was grounded and I knew better than to ask to go outside.  At some point, though, my father came to me and told me to go outside and play.  I was given a temporary reprieve from my well-deserved punishment for one simple reason – even while being disciplined, my parents still showed mercy.  In today’s key passage, we see that our Father in Heaven does the exact same thing.

David decided to take a census of all of the fighting men in Israel.  Normally, this might not have been a problem, but David wanted the men counted so that he could feel pride in the strength of his army.  Following all of the success he and his men had in war, David was beginning to trust his own military strength more than he trusted God.  Because of David’s sin, God spoke to Gad, David’s seer, and told him to offer David a choice of three different punishments.  David could choose between three years of famine, three months of war, or three days of plague in the land.  Before we continue, let me just point out that this alone was merciful of God.  He did not have to give David a choice about his correction, but He did because of His mercy.  David chose the three days of plague, because it was the one option that was a direct punishment from God.  He told Gad, “Let me fall into the hands of the LORD, for his mercy is very great; but do not let me fall into the hands of men.” (Vs. 13)  Once David had chosen his punishment, God sent a plague that killed 70, 000 men.  In verse 15 we read, “And God sent an angel to destroy Jerusalem. But as the angel was doing so, the LORD saw it and was grieved because of the calamity and said to the angel who was destroying the people, ‘Enough! Withdraw your hand.'”  Even though David sinned against God and deserved to be disciplined, God had mercy on him and the people of Israel.

When we act in sinful ways and we do not repent and turn from that sin, sometimes God has to discipline us.  He does this not to punish us but to correct us and to help us see the error of our ways and return to Him.  If He did not, He would not be a loving and concerned Father.  Just as we discipline our own children for their welfare, so does our heavenly Father lovingly correct His children for their benefit.  One thing that is certain, though, is that even when He has to discipline us, He will still show us mercy.  This perfect mercy of God is just one of the many characteristics that make our God so awesome.  The next time you receive a gentle correction from God, remember his amazing mercy, and praise Him for it.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Good Intentions


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 6; 1 Chronicles 13; Psalm 68; Matthew 17

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 13:1-14

 

I read a story the other day about a man who wanted to get his children goldfish.  He went to the pet store but found that aquariums are fairly expensive, so instead he found a used, dirty aquarium and purchased it for five dollars.  He took the aquarium home, cleaned it up, and made it look like new before adding four new goldfish to his children’s delight.  Sadly though, over the course of the next two days three of the four goldfish died.  He called the pet store to find out what was wrong, and he quickly realized his mistake.  He cleaned the aquarium with soap, which turned out to be toxic to the fish.  The man had the right intentions, but when he acted on his intentions, he did not do it in the right way, which led to the death of the goldfish.  In today’s key passage, we see a similar story of good intentions producing disastrous results.

For years the Ark of the Covenant was kept at a man named Abinadab’s house following its capture and return by the Philistines.  Now that David was finally king, he wanted to bring the ark back to Jerusalem, so he conferred with his officers and went with a small army to retrieve it.  When they reached the ark, they placed it on a new cart pulled by oxen and started the journey back to Jerusalem.  At one point, the oxen stumbled and a man named Uzzah reached out and touched the ark to steady it and keep it from falling off the cart.  In verse 10 we read, “The LORD’s anger burned against Uzzah, and he struck him down because he had put his hand on the ark. So he died there before God.”  Upon first reading this, it may seem like a pretty stiff punishment from God, but we need to understand a few things.  First, God provided strict instructions from the beginning that the ark should only be moved by the Levites (priests) using poles that held the ark by rings on the sides, and non-Levites should never touch the ark itself.  David and his group did not follow these instructions and instead transported the ark on a cart in the same way the Philistines transported the ark years earlier.  Secondly, we must realize that God is perfectly just and he cannot tolerate sin.  While David had good intentions in bringing the ark back to Jerusalem, he went about it the wrong way and sinned.  In addition, while Uzzah had good intentions in steadying the ark, he went about it the wrong way and sinned.  While God’s punishment of these sins may be hard for us to read about, we always have to keep in mind that as much as God loves us he is still perfectly just and severely punishes sin.

Both of these illustrations teach us a valuable lesson about intentions.  Having good intentions is important, but intentions alone are not enough.  We must act on our intentions, and we must act in the right way.  The best way to ensure we are acting in the right way is to seek guidance before we ever begin.  If the father in the story above sought guidance before cleaning the aquarium, he would not have used soap and would not have killed the goldfish.  If David sought God’s guidance before transporting the ark, he would not have used a cart and non-Levites and would not have killed Uzzah.  Seek to know God’s will before you act on good intentions and you can avoid disastrous results.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Casting Vision to our Children


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Chronicles 22-24; 1 Thessalonians 3

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 22:5-19

 

In the final few books of 1 Chronicles, we read all about the preparations David made for the building of the temple.  David originally wanted to build the temple himself, but God stopped him.  God had a different plan in mind and wanted David’s son Solomon to build the temple of the Lord.  Before his death, however, David began making the preparations necessary for the job.  He gathered the funds and supplies that would be needed, found the right craftsmen, planned the administration, and took steps to arrange the worship services.  The most important preparation he made, however, was not in laying out the construction or the division of duties.  His most important contribution to the job was the vision for the temple he cast with his son Solomon.  In today’s key verse, David calls his son to him and tells him all about the vision for his life.  In verses 7-10 we read, “David said to Solomon: “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house for the Name of the LORD my God. But this word of the LORD came to me: ‘You have shed much blood and have fought many wars. You are not to build a house for my Name, because you have shed much blood on the earth in my sight. But you will have a son who will be a man of peace and rest, and I will give him rest from all his enemies on every side. His name will be Solomon, and I will grant Israel peace and quiet during his reign. He is the one who will build a house for my Name. He will be my son, and I will be his father. And I will establish the throne of his kingdom over Israel forever.’”  Imagine how memorable this conversation must have been for Solomon, as his father took the time to cast vision to him about God.

One of the most important things we can do as parents is casting vision to our kids about God.  Most of us likely do not have as specific a vision for our children as David did, but we certainly all have a vision to share with them.  It is a vision of loving God with all of their hearts, souls, and minds.  It is a vision of loving their neighbors as themselves.  It is a vision of serving an all-powerful and loving God every day of their lives.  As much as we would like to, we cannot guarantee our children’s salvation.  Each of them must make their own personal choice to accept Jesus Christ as the Lord of their lives.  As parents, though, how we live and what we teach our children can play a HUGE role in how they develop.  The time we spend with them now casting vision, the prayers we pray with them and for them, and the way they see us interacting with others can all help a child grow into a Godly adult.  As we discussed a couple of days ago, we are all called to make disciples.  As parents, that job begins at home.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

God Disciplines with Mercy


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21; Psalm 30; 1 Thessalonians 2

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 21:1-19

 

Once when I was about eight years old or so I was particularly bad and my parents grounded me for two weeks.  During this time, I was not allowed to go outside and play, which in my mind was just about the worst punishment imaginable.  Sometime during this two-week period, my family and I went to my grandmother’s house on a Sunday afternoon to visit her, my aunt and uncle, and my cousins.  I can still remember standing inside my grandmother’s house starting out the window watching my brother and my cousins playing outside.  I was devastated.  All I wanted in the world was to go outside and play, but I knew that I was grounded and I knew better than to ask to go outside.  At some point, though, my father came to me and told me to go outside and play.  I was given a temporary reprieve from my well-deserved punishment for one simple reason – even while being disciplined, my parents still showed mercy.  In today’s key passage, we see that our Father in Heaven does the exact same thing.

David decided to take a census of all of the fighting men in Israel.  Normally, this might not have been a problem, but David wanted the men counted so that he could feel pride in the strength of his army.  Following all of the success he and his men had in war, David was beginning to trust his own military strength more than he trusted God.  Because of David’s sin, God spoke to Gad, David’s seer, and told him to offer David a choice of three different punishments.  David could choose between three years of famine, three months of war, or three days of plague in the land.  Before we continue, let me just point out that this alone was merciful of God.  He did not have to give David a choice about his correction, but He did because of His mercy.  David chose the three days of plague, because it was the one option that was a direct punishment from God.  He told Gad, “Let me fall into the hands of the LORD, for his mercy is very great; but do not let me fall into the hands of men.” (Vs. 13)  Once David had chosen his punishment, God sent a plague that killed 70, 000 men.  In verse 15 we read, “And God sent an angel to destroy Jerusalem. But as the angel was doing so, the LORD saw it and was grieved because of the calamity and said to the angel who was destroying the people, ‘Enough! Withdraw your hand.'”  Even though David sinned against God and deserved to be disciplined, God had mercy on him and the people of Israel.

When we act in sinful ways and we do not repent and turn from that sin, sometimes God has to discipline us.  He does this not to punish us but to correct us and to help us see the error of our ways and return to Him.  If He did not, He would not be a loving and concerned Father.  Just as we discipline our own children for their welfare, so does our heavenly Father lovingly correct His children for their benefit.  One thing that is certain, though, is that even when He has to discipline us, He will still show us mercy.  This perfect mercy of God is just one of the many characteristics that make our God so awesome.  The next time you receive a gentle correction from God, remember his amazing mercy, and praise Him for it.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Good Intentions


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 6; 1 Chronicles 13; Psalm 68; Matthew 17

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 13:1-14

 

I read a story the other day about a man who wanted to get his children goldfish.  He went to the pet store but found that aquariums are fairly expensive, so instead he found a used, dirty aquarium and purchased it for five dollars.  He took the aquarium home, cleaned it up, and made it look like new before adding four new goldfish to his children’s delight.  Sadly though, over the course of the next two days three of the four goldfish died.  He called the pet store to find out what was wrong, and he quickly realized his mistake.  He cleaned the aquarium with soap, which turned out to be toxic to the fish.  The man had the right intentions, but when he acted on his intentions, he did not do it in the right way, which led to the death of the goldfish.  In today’s key passage, we see a similar story of good intentions producing disastrous results.

For years the Ark of the Covenant was kept at a man named Abinadab’s house following its capture and return by the Philistines.  Now that David was finally king, he wanted to bring the ark back to Jerusalem, so he conferred with his officers and went with a small army to retrieve it.  When they reached the ark, they placed it on a new cart pulled by oxen and started the journey back to Jerusalem.  At one point, the oxen stumbled and a man named Uzzah reached out and touched the ark to steady it and keep it from falling off the cart.  In verse 10 we read, “The LORD’s anger burned against Uzzah, and he struck him down because he had put his hand on the ark. So he died there before God.”  Upon first reading this, it may seem like a pretty stiff punishment from God, but we need to understand a few things.  First, God provided strict instructions from the beginning that the ark should only be moved by the Levites (priests) using poles that held the ark by rings on the sides, and non-Levites should never touch the ark itself.  David and his group did not follow these instructions and instead transported the ark on a cart in the same way the Philistines transported the ark years earlier.  Secondly, we must realize that God is perfectly just and he cannot tolerate sin.  While David had good intentions in bringing the ark back to Jerusalem, he went about it the wrong way and sinned.  In addition, while Uzzah had good intentions in steadying the ark, he went about it the wrong way and sinned.  While God’s punishment of these sins may be hard for us to read about, we always have to keep in mind that as much as God loves us he is still perfectly just and severely punishes sin.

Both of these illustrations teach us a valuable lesson about intentions.  Having good intentions is important, but intentions alone are not enough.  We must act on our intentions, and we must act in the right way.  The best way to ensure we are acting in the right way is to seek guidance before we ever begin.  If the father in the story above sought guidance before cleaning the aquarium, he would not have used soap and would not have killed the goldfish.  If David sought God’s guidance before transporting the ark, he would not have used a cart and non-Levites and would not have killed Uzzah.  Seek to know God’s will before you act on good intentions and you can avoid disastrous results.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Casting Vision to our Children


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Chronicles 22-24; 1 Thessalonians 3

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Chronicles 22:5-19

 

In the final few books of 1 Chronicles, we read all about the preparations David made for the building of the temple.  David originally wanted to build the temple himself, but God stopped him.  God had a different plan in mind and wanted David’s son Solomon to build the temple of the Lord.  Before his death, however, David began making the preparations necessary for the job.  He gathered the funds and supplies that would be needed, found the right craftsmen, planned the administration, and took steps to arrange the worship services.  The most important preparation he made, however, was not in laying out the construction or the division of duties.  His most important contribution to the job was the vision for the temple he cast with his son Solomon.  In today’s key verse, David calls his son to him and tells him all about the vision for his life.  In verses 7-10 we read, “David said to Solomon: “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house for the Name of the LORD my God. But this word of the LORD came to me: ‘You have shed much blood and have fought many wars. You are not to build a house for my Name, because you have shed much blood on the earth in my sight. But you will have a son who will be a man of peace and rest, and I will give him rest from all his enemies on every side. His name will be Solomon, and I will grant Israel peace and quiet during his reign. He is the one who will build a house for my Name. He will be my son, and I will be his father. And I will establish the throne of his kingdom over Israel forever.’”  Imagine how memorable this conversation must have been for Solomon, as his father took the time to cast vision to him about God.

One of the most important things we can do as parents is casting vision to our kids about God.  Most of us likely do not have as specific a vision for our children as David did, but we certainly all have a vision to share with them.  It is a vision of loving God with all of their hearts, souls, and minds.  It is a vision of loving their neighbors as themselves.  It is a vision of serving an all-powerful and loving God every day of their lives.  As much as we would like to, we cannot guarantee our children’s salvation.  Each of them must make their own personal choice to accept Jesus Christ as the Lord of their lives.  As parents, though, how we live and what we teach our children can play a HUGE role in how they develop.  The time we spend with them now casting vision, the prayers we pray with them and for them, and the way they see us interacting with others can all help a child grow into a Godly adult.  As we discussed a couple of days ago, we are all called to make disciples.  As parents, that job begins at home.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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