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The Snowball Effect of Sin


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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Dealing with a Fool


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 25, 26; Psalm 63; Matthew 9

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Samuel 25:1-38

 

It is funny how sometimes God sends you a passage of Scripture right when you need to hear it most.  On the day I wrote this message, I was on the phone with a man I know quite well.  In the interest of time, I will skip the boring details of our conversation and simply say that we were not seeing eye-to-eye.  We disagreed about a course of action to take, and as our conversation progressed he started to demonstrate his irritation by raising his voice and using some rather course language.  Now, I have to admit that my initial reaction to this was not exactly what it should have been.  I began thinking in the flesh, and the more he talked the more my anger began to burn inside me.  My mind raced with thoughts of “how dare he talk to me this way” and the like, and I noticed that my tone of voice was also beginning to rise.  It is at that point that God stepped in and spoke to my heart that I was not walking down the right path.  I was beginning to respond to rudeness with rudeness, and I immediately had to take a deep breath and say a quick prayer for grace.  A few hours later when I read today’s key passage, I had to just stop and smile at the divine providence of God.

In today’s key passage, David had to deal with a fool.  Please understand that a fool in this context does not have anything to do with mental capacity.  A fool in a Biblical context refers to someone who is foolish in the eyes of God.  David and his men spent a good deal of time and energy protecting Nabal’s possessions, but when David sent some of his men to Nabal to ask for some supplies they were treated with hostility and rudeness.  David’s immediate reaction when he heard the news was to take an army and wipe out Nabal and all of his men.  Along the way, Abigail, Nabal’s wife, stopped David and talked some sense into him.  From their story, we can learn four valuable lessons about dealing with a fool:

  1. We must recognize a fool for what he is.  Abigail gave David good advice to not let Nabal’s foolish actions ruin his testimony for God.
  2. Even if it is our initial reaction, we must refrain from trying to “get even” with the fool.  Abigail makes it clear to David that it would not be right for him to take matters into his own hands to try to get revenge on Nabal.
  3. When in doubt, receive Godly counsel from others.  Fortunately for David, Abigail was willing to try to talk him out of his foolish response, and, perhaps more importantly, David was willing to listen.
  4. Allow God to deal with the problem.  Instead of taking matters into his own hands, David decided to let God deal with Nabal.  In this case, God decided in His infinite wisdom to kill Nabal.  In other cases, He may simply give you the strength and grace needed to deal with the fool in the future.

The Bible is so good at teaching us valuable life lessons through others experiences.  I pray that the next time you have to deal with a “fool”, you will remember this story and apply its principles to your life.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Facing a Giant


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 17; Psalm 9; Matthew 2

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Samuel 17:1-50


In today’s key passage, we read the popular story of David and Goliath.  Most of us have likely read this story before or have at least heard of it.  It is the type of Bible story that we are often told as kids in Sunday school, and there are many lessons to be learned from it.  Today, I would like to focus on the practical aspects of this story that we can all use as we walk through our lives.  The Philistines had moved into Israel’s territory and set up camp, so King Saul put together an army to face off against them.  The two armies were each perched on opposing hills with a valley in between them.  At this time in history, armies wanted to avoid losing a lot of troops in a long, drawn out battle, so it was common for an army to pit their strongest soldier against the strongest soldier of the opposing army for a “winner-take-all” battle.  Out of the Philistine camp came a giant named Goliath.  He was big, he was powerful, he was armed with heavy weapons, and he wanted to fight one of the Israelites to settle the battle.  When King Saul and the Israelites saw Goliath, they were all filled with fear.  They did not know how they could possibly defeat this formidable foe.  For forty days, Goliath would come out of the Philistine camp and intimidate the Israelites, challenging them to send someone to oppose him, but none of the Israelites would dare go against him.  All of the Israelites, including Saul, were focused on their own self-preservation, so they were frozen in their fear and unable to move forward against their enemy.

One day David, a young shepherd who was tending his father’s flock was sent to the front lines to bring provisions and to get a report on the war.  As he arrived, he saw Goliath come out of the Philistine camp for his daily taunting of the Israelites.  Unlike the rest of the Israelites, David’s focus was not on his fear or on self-preservation.  His focus was on the glory of God.  He said, “Who is this unbeliever, that he should defy the armies of the living God?” (Vs. 26)  David was confident that God would defeat this enemy.  He knew that this giant was no match for the Lord of Lords and the King of Kings, so he decided to step up and face off against the giant.  Though the other Israelites did not believe David could defeat Goliath, David still made the lonely walk to face off against the giant.  David had the faith to know that while he could not defeat the giant alone, God was with him in the battle.  In the end, David defeated Goliath using only a slingshot and a single stone.

As we walk through our lives, every single one of us will face off against “giants”.  These “giants” might be people who oppose us.  They might be habitual sins that we have trouble standing up to.  They might be difficult circumstances, illnesses, or financial problems.  Whatever the case may be, these “giants” will be a very real threat to us just as Goliath was a very real threat to the Israelites.  When we face these giants, we have a choice to make.  We can choose to be paralyzed with fear like Saul and the Israelites, afraid to move forward against the “giant”, or we can choose to have faith in God to solve our problems like David.  We can choose to focus on our own self-preservation, or we can choose to focus on the glory of God.  With the right faith in God, we can trust that He will deliver us from our “giants”.  With the right faith in God, we can be sure that He will bring us victory in His own time.  With the right faith in God, there is nothing we cannot overcome.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.


Moving On


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 15,16; 1 Chronicles 5; Matthew 1

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Samuel 15:34-16:13

Life is filled with disappointments.  We will be disappointed by our own actions, circumstances, or health conditions.  We will be disappointed by others.  There are so many things in this life that will disappoint us, and it can be very easy to let these disappointments get us so discouraged that we stop serving the Lord.  When things are not going the way we would like them to go, we can have a tendency to give up, but there is a time to accept the disappointments we have faced and move on to whatever God has planned for us next.  In today’s key passage, the prophet Samuel was disappointed.  He had anointed Saul as King of Israel, but because Saul chose not to follow God’s instructions, he had failed.  Samuel was in deep mourning over Saul’s failure, but through his pain God teaches us four lessons about moving on after a disappointment.

The first lesson we learn is that there is a time to stop mourning.  In Verse 1 we read, “The LORD said to Samuel, “How long will you mourn for Saul, since I have rejected him as king over Israel? Fill your horn with oil and be on your way; I am sending you to Jesse of Bethlehem. I have chosen one of his sons to be king.”  Even though Samuel was disappointed about Saul’s failure, God knew that his mourning would never change the situation.  There is a time to stop grieving and realize that in spite of whatever disappointments we have faced, God is in control.

The second lesson we learn is that we must accept God’s will.  Samuel believed that Saul was going to be a good king when he anointed him, but God rejected Saul because of his own actions.  Samuel had to accept the fact that God had another plan for Israel and for him.  Many times, we tend to hold on to what we think God’s will should be for our lives, when in reality God might have an entirely different plan for us. No matter what we might think at the present time, God’s plan for us is always the best plan, even if it does not fit into our current way of thinking.

The third lesson we learn is that there will come a time when we must simply move on to the next thing God is calling us to do.  God’s plan was for Samuel to go to Bethlehem and anoint another king.  Although Samuel was afraid of what Saul would do if he heard about Samuel anointing another king, he still chose to obey God and go to Bethlehem.  When we finally stop mourning over a disappointment and accept God’s will for our lives, we will find we can move forward and do as God directs.

The final lesson we learn is that we have to follow God’s directions as we move forward.  When Samuel first saw Jesse’s son Eliab, he immediately assumed that this would be the new king.  It was not until he heard from God that he realized his mistake.  He had to listen for God’s guidance and God ultimately led him to David as the new king of Israel.  Following our disappointments, we need to spend time getting back in tune with God.

Moving on from disappointment can be a hard thing to do, but it is something we will all need to do in this life.  Fortunately, God provides us with a road map to follow on our journey.  As we read His Word daily, we can learn His tips for moving on, and we can ensure we are following Him.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Trusting God’s Plan


Daily Bible Reading – Ruth 3,4; Psalms 64,65; 2 Corinthians 6

Today’s Key Passage – Ruth 4:9-22

In today’s reading, we finish the story of Ruth.  Yesterday, we read about her hardships.  We found out that Ruth was a widow living in poverty.  To feed herself and her mother-in-law, she found a field belonging to Boaz and gleaned.  Today, the story is wrapped up when Boaz and Ruth get married and have a child.  The story of Ruth is a good one – one that almost sounds like it would make a great plot for a movie.  Picture this – a woman loses her husband and moves to a town far away where the only person she knows is her mother-in-law.  There she lives in poverty until she receives charity from a man who owns some land.  He notices her and they end up falling in love and having a baby.  That is a great movie right?  If that was the end of the story, it would still be a good one, but the story of Ruth has so much more to offer.  You see, the child they had together was named Obed (which means worship).  Obed would go on to have a child named Jesse, and Jesse would go on to have a child named David who would later become known as King David.  King David’s genealogy would continue through a few more generations all the way to a baby born in a manger in Bethlehem.  When Ruth married Boaz and had a child, she set off a chain of events that would culminate in the birth of Jesus Christ.

When I read the story of Ruth, I think about how she must have felt when she lost her husband.  I cannot even begin to imagine the pain that must come with losing a spouse.  On top of that, she found herself living in poverty, literally picking up scraps from a field to eat, and living in a foreign land.  How easy would it have been for Ruth to start to question God?  How easy would it have been for her to think God had completely left her?  Throughout all of these hardships, though, Ruth remained dedicated and faithful to God.   She trusted that God had a plan for her and that He would work out her situation in His time.  God used her painful situation to bring about events that would lead to the greatest event in the history of mankind – the birth, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.  Of course, Ruth could not have possibly known this at the time.  All she could see was her present situation.  All she could see was her pain.  When we face trials, no matter how bad they are, we can rest in knowing that God has a plan for us.  Sometimes the trials we face, as painful as they may be, are absolutely necessary for God’s plan.  If Ruth had not lost her husband and become poor, she never would have ended up in that field meeting the man she would marry, and she never would have given birth to a genealogical line that would end with Jesus Christ.  Very often, when we face difficulties or when things do not go according to our “plans”, we find it difficult to see how our pain might turn out to be a great thing for us.  We can only see a tiny dot in the big picture of life.  God, however, can see the whole picture.  He knows where each piece fits.  We can trust His plan and we can have faith that everything He does is for the greater good.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Proclaiming the Greatness of God


Daily Bible Reading – Judges 17,18; Psalm 89; 2 Corinthians 3

Today’s Key Passage – Psalm 89

In reading Psalm 89 today, I was struck by the first two verses in which the psalmist says, “I will sing of the LORD’s great love forever; with my mouth I will make your faithfulness known through all generations. I will declare that your love stands firm forever, that you established your faithfulness in heaven itself.” God had promised to preserve David’s descendants and to make one of them the king of the earth forever.  The psalmist was so overjoyed by this fact that he wanted to tell everyone he knew.  He wanted to sing God’s praises forever.  He wanted to shout from the rooftops about the greatness of God.  He talks about the strength of God in verse 8 when he says, “O LORD God Almighty, who is like you? You are mighty, O LORD, and your faithfulness surrounds you.” He talks about God owning everything in verses 11-12 when he says, “The heavens are yours, and yours also the earth; you founded the world and all that is in it. You created the north and the south; Tabor and Hermon sing for joy at your name.” He praises God’s character in verse 14 when he says, “Righteousness and justice are the foundation of your throne; love and faithfulness go before you.” He talks about the joy God brings in verses 15-16 when he says, “Blessed are those who have learned to acclaim you, who walk in the light of your presence, O LORD. They rejoice in your name all day long; they exult in your righteousness.” The psalmist has found so many reasons to exalt and revere God that he simply cannot hold them all in any longer.  He must proclaim God’s greatness to everyone he knows.

This psalmist was on fire for God because of a promise.  At this point in history, God had simply promised David that someday one of his descendants would rule forever.  As excited as this psalmist was about this promise, he did not even know the whole story that we know today.  He did not know that Jesus Christ would be born from David’s line, but would also be born from God.  He did not know that Christ would live a perfect life and would die for the sins of the world.  He did not know that Jesus would be resurrected and would sit at the right hand of God interceding for us.  He did not know that Christ would reign forever.  Fortunately, we have the benefit of knowing these things.  As excited as the psalmist was, how much more excited should we be?  How much louder should we be shouting from the rooftops?  When we are born again and Christ comes to live inside of us, we are filled with the joy of knowing that these promises God has made are true.  As the Holy Spirit inside of us begins making changes in us, we will find that, like the psalmist, we cannot help but to proclaim the greatness of God.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

The Snowball Effect of Sin


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 11,12; Psalm 51; Matthew 23

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 11:1-27

 

The life of King David is well chronicled in the Bible.  He was truly a man after God’s heart, and he lived much of his life to please his master.  Though the perfect Messiah, Jesus Christ, would later come from David’s bloodline, King David himself was not perfect.  He sinned on many occasions, and perhaps his greatest sin is captured in today’s key passage.

Have you ever seen a snowball rolling down a hill?  As it continues down a hill, a small snowball will continue to pick up more and more snow and will eventually become huge.  Most of the time, sin works the exact same way.  David’s greatest sin began quite innocently.  It all began with the sin of laziness.  It was spring, which was the time when kings would traditionally go off to war, but David decided that he would stay in Jerusalem and send Joab out instead.  One night, David was walking around on his roof and saw a beautiful woman named Bathsheba taking a bath.  Her beauty tempted David, and instead of turning away from that temptation, he inquired about her.  He had Bathsheba brought to his palace, and he committed adultery with her.  This in itself was bad enough, as everyone including David knows that adultery is a sin, and if this was the end of the story that would be one thing.  Sadly, David’s sin only gets worse.

Shortly after sleeping with Bathsheba, she sent word back to David that she was pregnant, so David tried to think of a way to hide his sin.  First, he sent word to Joab to send Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the war.  David was hoping that Uriah would go home and sleep with his wife so her pregnancy could be attributed to him, but Uriah refused to go home while his friends were still fighting a battle.  Since Uriah would not cooperate with David’s plan, David told Joab to put Uriah at the front lines of the war so that he would be killed in battle.

The consequences of David’s sin were far-reaching.  Some of the consequences, such as Uriah’s death, were immediate.  Other consequences, such as the death of his son, the turmoil in his family, and the national rebellion against him would come later.  It is interesting to note, however, that all of this started with the single, seemingly innocent sin of laziness.  If David had fulfilled his duty as king and gone to war, none of these consequences would have happened.  David had many chances along to way to stop sinning and turn back to God, but each time he instead decided to sin further, making the situation infinitely worse each time.  Never believe the lie that there is “innocent” sin.  Never believe the lie that one little sin is not going to hurt anyone.  You never know where that one little sin is going to lead, and you never know who is going to get hurt.  At the first sight of sin, it is important that we recognize it, confess it to God, and repent.  Anything less can lead to dire consequences.  Anything less can eventually snowball out of control.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Dealing with a Fool


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 25, 26; Psalm 63; Matthew 9

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Samuel 25:1-38

 

It is funny how sometimes God sends you a passage of Scripture right when you need to hear it most.  On the day I wrote this message, I was on the phone with a man I know quite well.  In the interest of time, I will skip the boring details of our conversation and simply say that we were not seeing eye-to-eye.  We disagreed about a course of action to take, and as our conversation progressed he started to demonstrate his irritation by raising his voice and using some rather course language.  Now, I have to admit that my initial reaction to this was not exactly what it should have been.  I began thinking in the flesh, and the more he talked the more my anger began to burn inside me.  My mind raced with thoughts of “how dare he talk to me this way” and the like, and I noticed that my tone of voice was also beginning to rise.  It is at that point that God stepped in and spoke to my heart that I was not walking down the right path.  I was beginning to respond to rudeness with rudeness, and I immediately had to take a deep breath and say a quick prayer for grace.  A few hours later when I read today’s key passage, I had to just stop and smile at the divine providence of God.

In today’s key passage, David had to deal with a fool.  Please understand that a fool in this context does not have anything to do with mental capacity.  A fool in a Biblical context refers to someone who is foolish in the eyes of God.  David and his men spent a good deal of time and energy protecting Nabal’s possessions, but when David sent some of his men to Nabal to ask for some supplies they were treated with hostility and rudeness.  David’s immediate reaction when he heard the news was to take an army and wipe out Nabal and all of his men.  Along the way, Abigail, Nabal’s wife, stopped David and talked some sense into him.  From their story, we can learn four valuable lessons about dealing with a fool:

  1. We must recognize a fool for what he is.  Abigail gave David good advice to not let Nabal’s foolish actions ruin his testimony for God.
  2. Even if it is our initial reaction, we must refrain from trying to “get even” with the fool.  Abigail makes it clear to David that it would not be right for him to take matters into his own hands to try to get revenge on Nabal.
  3. When in doubt, receive Godly counsel from others.  Fortunately for David, Abigail was willing to try to talk him out of his foolish response, and, perhaps more importantly, David was willing to listen.
  4. Allow God to deal with the problem.  Instead of taking matters into his own hands, David decided to let God deal with Nabal.  In this case, God decided in His infinite wisdom to kill Nabal.  In other cases, He may simply give you the strength and grace needed to deal with the fool in the future.

The Bible is so good at teaching us valuable life lessons through others experiences.  I pray that the next time you have to deal with a “fool”, you will remember this story and apply its principles to your life.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Facing a Giant


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 17; Psalm 9; Matthew 2

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Samuel 17:1-50


In today’s key passage, we read the popular story of David and Goliath.  Most of us have likely read this story before or have at least heard of it.  It is the type of Bible story that we are often told as kids in Sunday school, and there are many lessons to be learned from it.  Today, I would like to focus on the practical aspects of this story that we can all use as we walk through our lives.  The Philistines had moved into Israel’s territory and set up camp, so King Saul put together an army to face off against them.  The two armies were each perched on opposing hills with a valley in between them.  At this time in history, armies wanted to avoid losing a lot of troops in a long, drawn out battle, so it was common for an army to pit their strongest soldier against the strongest soldier of the opposing army for a “winner-take-all” battle.  Out of the Philistine camp came a giant named Goliath.  He was big, he was powerful, he was armed with heavy weapons, and he wanted to fight one of the Israelites to settle the battle.  When King Saul and the Israelites saw Goliath, they were all filled with fear.  They did not know how they could possibly defeat this formidable foe.  For forty days, Goliath would come out of the Philistine camp and intimidate the Israelites, challenging them to send someone to oppose him, but none of the Israelites would dare go against him.  All of the Israelites, including Saul, were focused on their own self-preservation, so they were frozen in their fear and unable to move forward against their enemy.

One day David, a young shepherd who was tending his father’s flock was sent to the front lines to bring provisions and to get a report on the war.  As he arrived, he saw Goliath come out of the Philistine camp for his daily taunting of the Israelites.  Unlike the rest of the Israelites, David’s focus was not on his fear or on self-preservation.  His focus was on the glory of God.  He said, “Who is this unbeliever, that he should defy the armies of the living God?” (Vs. 26)  David was confident that God would defeat this enemy.  He knew that this giant was no match for the Lord of Lords and the King of Kings, so he decided to step up and face off against the giant.  Though the other Israelites did not believe David could defeat Goliath, David still made the lonely walk to face off against the giant.  David had the faith to know that while he could not defeat the giant alone, God was with him in the battle.  In the end, David defeated Goliath using only a slingshot and a single stone.

As we walk through our lives, every single one of us will face off against “giants”.  These “giants” might be people who oppose us.  They might be habitual sins that we have trouble standing up to.  They might be difficult circumstances, illnesses, or financial problems.  Whatever the case may be, these “giants” will be a very real threat to us just as Goliath was a very real threat to the Israelites.  When we face these giants, we have a choice to make.  We can choose to be paralyzed with fear like Saul and the Israelites, afraid to move forward against the “giant”, or we can choose to have faith in God to solve our problems like David.  We can choose to focus on our own self-preservation, or we can choose to focus on the glory of God.  With the right faith in God, we can trust that He will deliver us from our “giants”.  With the right faith in God, we can be sure that He will bring us victory in His own time.  With the right faith in God, there is nothing we cannot overcome.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.


Moving On


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 15,16; 1 Chronicles 5; Matthew 1

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Samuel 15:34-16:13

Life is filled with disappointments.  We will be disappointed by our own actions, circumstances, or health conditions.  We will be disappointed by others.  There are so many things in this life that will disappoint us, and it can be very easy to let these disappointments get us so discouraged that we stop serving the Lord.  When things are not going the way we would like them to go, we can have a tendency to give up, but there is a time to accept the disappointments we have faced and move on to whatever God has planned for us next.  In today’s key passage, the prophet Samuel was disappointed.  He had anointed Saul as King of Israel, but because Saul chose not to follow God’s instructions, he had failed.  Samuel was in deep mourning over Saul’s failure, but through his pain God teaches us four lessons about moving on after a disappointment.

The first lesson we learn is that there is a time to stop mourning.  In Verse 1 we read, “The LORD said to Samuel, “How long will you mourn for Saul, since I have rejected him as king over Israel? Fill your horn with oil and be on your way; I am sending you to Jesse of Bethlehem. I have chosen one of his sons to be king.”  Even though Samuel was disappointed about Saul’s failure, God knew that his mourning would never change the situation.  There is a time to stop grieving and realize that in spite of whatever disappointments we have faced, God is in control.

The second lesson we learn is that we must accept God’s will.  Samuel believed that Saul was going to be a good king when he anointed him, but God rejected Saul because of his own actions.  Samuel had to accept the fact that God had another plan for Israel and for him.  Many times, we tend to hold on to what we think God’s will should be for our lives, when in reality God might have an entirely different plan for us. No matter what we might think at the present time, God’s plan for us is always the best plan, even if it does not fit into our current way of thinking.

The third lesson we learn is that there will come a time when we must simply move on to the next thing God is calling us to do.  God’s plan was for Samuel to go to Bethlehem and anoint another king.  Although Samuel was afraid of what Saul would do if he heard about Samuel anointing another king, he still chose to obey God and go to Bethlehem.  When we finally stop mourning over a disappointment and accept God’s will for our lives, we will find we can move forward and do as God directs.

The final lesson we learn is that we have to follow God’s directions as we move forward.  When Samuel first saw Jesse’s son Eliab, he immediately assumed that this would be the new king.  It was not until he heard from God that he realized his mistake.  He had to listen for God’s guidance and God ultimately led him to David as the new king of Israel.  Following our disappointments, we need to spend time getting back in tune with God.

Moving on from disappointment can be a hard thing to do, but it is something we will all need to do in this life.  Fortunately, God provides us with a road map to follow on our journey.  As we read His Word daily, we can learn His tips for moving on, and we can ensure we are following Him.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

To follow me on Twitter for inspirational tweets, click the follow button –

If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

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