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The Donkey’s Role


Daily Bible Reading – Esther 9, 10; Luke 19

Today’s Key Passage – Luke 19:28-44

 

Last week, we read Zechariah’s prophecy that the Messiah would ride into Jerusalem on a donkey’s colt. (Zechariah 9:9)  In today’s key passage, Jesus made his triumphant entry into Jerusalem fulfilling this prophecy.  Jesus knew what He was going to face in Jerusalem.  He knew He would be degraded, beaten, and ultimately killed, but He went there anyway because this was the will of the Father.  This was God’s ultimate plan for humanity.  As He entered Jerusalem on that donkey, the crowd, familiar with Zechariah’s words, rejoiced at the coming of their King.  They spread their cloaks and palm branches along the road and shouted, “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!” and “Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” (19:38)  Of course, a short time later these same people would yell, “Crucify him!” (23:21), but it must have been quite a site to see Jesus on the donkey that day.

While preaching about this story, I once heard a pastor ask the question, “What if the donkey thought all of the praise and shouting that day was for him?”  While it is humorous to humanize a donkey in this way and imagine what he might have been thinking on that fateful day, it does bring up an interesting point.  See, the donkey needed to know his role.  He needed to understand that all of the fanfare of that moment had absolutely nothing to do with him.  No one was shouting because of what he was doing, they were shouting about what Jesus was doing.  The donkey was simply there to lift up Jesus.  Ironically, our role is exactly the same as the donkey.  We are not here on this earth to receive shouts of joy and praise.  We are not here to see fanfare based on what we are doing.  Our role in this life is simply to lift up Jesus.  Let us all be like the donkey today, and lift Him up for the praise He deserves.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Extra Credit


Daily Bible Reading – Esther 1, 2; Psalm 150; Luke 17

Today’s Key Passage – Luke 17:1-10

 

When she was in the third grade, my daughter would receive a list of words at the beginning of each week to study in preparation for a spelling test on Friday.  On the list of words, her teacher would provide two “extra credit” words, which were much more difficult than the other words on the list.  If spelled correctly on the test, these two words could take the place of other words that may have been misspelled.  Because of their importance, my daughter would always spend a bit more time studying those two words just in case she made any mistakes with the other words.

Many times, we can wrongly believe that when we live obediently to God’s Word we are doing “extra credit” work.  We might feel that a few good deeds can make up for any sinfulness we may cling to in our hearts.  In today’s key passage, Jesus dispels this myth.  He tells His disciples to be careful not to cause anyone else to sin (17:1-2), to correct wrongdoers, and to forgive others who repent. (17:3-4)  The disciples realized they could never be obedient to these commands in their own strength and asked Jesus to increase their faith (17:5), but Jesus told them that even a small amount of faith was sufficient for them to obey. (17:6)  He then went on to tell them a parable about a servant who worked for his master not to receive praise, but because it was his duty. (17:7-10)

As followers of Christ, we are His servants.  When we act in accordance to His will, we should not do so in order to garner praise or to try to build up “extra credit” in Heaven.  We should live according to His commands because it is our duty.  Instead of feeling prideful for the deeds we complete in His name, we can all feel blessed to be given the opportunity to serve Him and others, and we can obey His Word because of our great love for Him.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Giving God the Glory


Daily Bible Reading – Daniel 1, 2; Revelation 16

Today’s Key Passage – Daniel 2:24-49

 

After the fall of Jerusalem, many of the wisest men were taken back to Babylon to serve the king.  Daniel was one of these men.  When King Nebuchadnezzar had a disturbing dream (Vs. 1), he called together some of his astrologers and asked them to tell him about his dream and interpret it (Vs. 5).  When none of these false prophets were able to do as the king asked (Vss. 10-11), Nebuchadnezzar ordered the execution of all the wise men in Babylon, including Daniel and his friends. (Vs. 12)  Fortunately, God spoke to Daniel and told him about Nebuchadnezzar’s dream (Vs. 19), so he went to the king to spare his life and the lives of his friends. (Vs. 24)  Before talking to Nebuchadnezzar about his dream, Daniel took time to give God credit by saying, “No wise man, enchanter, magician or diviner can explain to the king the mystery he has asked about, but there is a God in heaven who reveals mysteries.” (Vss. 27-28)  This step proved to be vitally important, because after Daniel successfully interpreted Nebuchadnezzar’s dream, he honored God and said, “Surely your God is the God of gods and the Lord of kings and a revealer of mysteries”. (Vs. 47)

When other people offer us praise for what we have done, we can choose to take all the credit or we can give the glory to God.  When we selfishly take the credit for God’s work, we rob Him of the glory He rightly deserves, but when we give the glory to God, we gain a wonderful opportunity.  When we give God the glory, we are able to be His witness on this earth, and we are able to tell someone who might be far from God all about His awesome power and love.  The next time you find yourself in that position, choose to give the glory to the One who made you and who allows you to do every good thing you do.  Give the glory to God, and then use the opportunity to tell others the Good News.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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Learning Humility


Daily Bible Reading – Proverbs 25-27; Romans 15

Today’s Key Passage – Proverbs 25:6-7; 25:27; 26:12; 27:2; 27:21

 

One of the toughest things for many people to learn is humility.  As followers of Christ, we are called to be humble servants just as our Lord and Savior lived His life as a humble servant.  Humility is tough, particularly for those of us who struggle with pride.  Like most difficult topics, we can find advice and strength in God’s Word to help us in learning humility.  In our reading of the book of Proverbs today, we find a wealth of advice on learning how to live a humble life.  If you struggle with humility, follow along with me as we review five principles for success found in today’s key passage:

Do not exalt yourself – “Do not exalt yourself in the king’s presence, and do not claim a place among great men; it is better for him to say to you, “Come up here,” than for him to humiliate you before a nobleman.” (Vss. 25:6-7)  Jesus turned this proverb into a parable in Luke 14:7-11.  Instead of exalting ourselves and taking the most, we should humble ourselves and take the least.

Do not seek your own honor – “It is not good to eat too much honey, nor is it honorable to seek one’s own honor.” (Vs. 25:27)  No good can come from looking for the honors that we believe we deserve.  When we do things only to be honored by others, we will find ourselves bitter and angry when those honors do not pan out.  Instead of seeking our own honor, we should always seek to honor God with all that we do.  When we give the glory to Him, we will never be disappointed.

Do not be wise in your own eyes – “Do you see a man wise in his own eyes? There is more hope for a fool than for him.” (Vs. 26:12)  When we believe we have nothing left to learn, we are heading for a fall.  A man who is “wise in his own eyes” is not willing to accept correction and is not able to mature as a Christian.  When we realize we have more to learn, God will gladly teach us.

Do not praise yourself – “Let another praise you, and not your own mouth; someone else, and not your own lips.” (Vs. 27:2)  There are few things in life more overbearing than a man who praises himself.  Others see right through it, and instead of praise, the man only serves to damage his relationships.  If praise is deserved, you will receive it from others without having to ask for it.  More importantly, if the only praise you truly seek is from God, your motives will be much more in line with His will.

Do not let praise affect your work – “The crucible for silver and the furnace for gold, but man is tested by the praise he receives.” (Vs. 27:21)  How we react to praise tells a lot about our character.  People with integrity are not swayed by praise.  They do not work harder after receiving praise and do not get lazy when praise does not come.  When we work hard and strive to do the right thing regardless of the praise we might receive, we will find ourselves more useful to God for His divine work.

Humility is a character trait that is difficult to learn, but living a humble life is worth the growing pains.  As we learn humility through God’s Word, our relationships will improve and we will be better equipped for God’s purposes.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Admitting When You’re Wrong


Daily Bible Reading – 2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 20; Psalm 20; Matthew 22

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Samuel 10:1-19

 

There are many popular phrases in the English language.  “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”  “The ball is in your court.”  “Do not put all of your eggs in one basket.”  Most people have heard these phrases (and countless others) often, and even use them in their own communication from time to time.  As I was reading today’s key passage, I began thinking about two other phrases that seem to be a lot less popular these days.  You do not hear them very often, but when you do, they can have a big impact.  In fact, it is hard for me to think of any other phrases that can mean as much to the health and wellbeing of our relationships with other people.  What are these two phrases?  They are “I was wrong” and “I am sorry”.

In today’s key passage, we read that the king of the Ammonites died and his son Hanun succeeded him.  David wanted to show kindness to Hanun, so he sent a delegation to express his sympathy to Hanun concerning his father.  When the delegation arrived, the Ammonite nobles wrongly believed that they were sent by David to spy on the land in advance of an attack.  Hanun believed his nobles and seized David’s men, shaved their beards, and cut their garments to humiliate them.  When Hanun realized that David was angry over this situation, he could have admitted he was wrong.  He could have apologized to David and his men and tried to keep the peace.  Instead, Hanun gathered his troops to go to war with David.  In the end, David and his army (with the help of God of course) annihilated Hanun and the Ammonites.

When we realize we are wrong, how we react will often define our character.  When pride sets in, it can become difficult to admit our mistakes or apologize, and because of this, the most common reaction for many people is to respond angrily or defensively.  Most of the time, though, this only serves to escalate the problem and further fracture our already fragile relationships.  As we get closer and closer to God, He will help us in this area.  He will help us recognize our mistakes sooner, He will help us admit when we are wrong, and He will help us to apologize.  Romans 12:18 reminds us, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”  The next time you realize you are in the wrong, do not react like Hanun.  There is no shame in saying “I was wrong”.  There is nothing wrong with saying “I am sorry”.  Learn to use these phrases, and learn to live at peace with everyone.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Freely You Have Received, Freely Give


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 27; Psalm 141; 1 Chronicles 9; Matthew 10

Today’s Key Passage – Matthew 10:5-10

 

In today’s key passage, Jesus is getting ready to send His disciples out into the world for the first time on their own.  He has spent time with them and He has trained them, and now He is sending them to reach others.  He tells them to go to the “lost sheep of Israel” and preach the message that the Kingdom of Heaven is near.  He gives them the power they will need to heal the sick, raise the dead, and drive out demons.  Just before they leave, Jesus gives the disciples a principle that they should use to guide their actions as they go from town to town preaching His message to others.  He tells them, “Freely you have received, freely give.” (Vs. 8)  When I first read this verse, my first reaction was that Jesus was talking about generous giving.  God gives us so much in this life and blesses us in so many ways, that the very least we can do is share that wealth with others by freely giving of our time, money, and possessions to help others.  While this is obviously sound advice and something that we should all practice in our lives, the more I read this passage today the more I started to believe that Jesus was talking about a lot more than just material goods.

As I sat quietly today talking with God and thinking about this passage, I tried to focus on all the different things we have received from Him.  The more I meditated on it, the longer the list became, so I began to write down some of the things we freely receive from God that we can freely give.  Below are some of the items on my list:

  • Freely we have received His grace and mercy, and freely we should extend that grace and mercy to others.
  • Freely we have received His forgiveness of our sins, and freely we should forgive others of their transgressions.
  • Freely we have received His encouragement, and freely we should encourage others.
  • Freely we have received His wisdom, and freely we should share that wisdom with others.
  • Freely we have received His love, and freely we should show that love to others.

Perhaps the most important thing on my list that we have received from God is the Good News about Jesus Christ.  Each of us has been saved by His grace through faith in Jesus, and the fact is that at some point in our lives we learned about our Savior because someone somewhere cared enough about us to share the Gospel with us.  God freely gives us salvation, but in order for people to receive His gift, they have to first hear the Good News.  That is where we come in.  Freely we have received salvation through His Good News, and freely we should share that Good News with others.  I encourage you today to make a list of all the things you have freely received from God that you can freely give to others.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Finding Strength in Our Weaknesses


Daily Bible Reading – 1 Samuel 13; 1 Chronicles 2,3; 2 Corinthians 12

Today’s Key Passage – 2 Corinthians 12:7-10

There are many times in the Bible when what we read seems to contradict what our earthly minds believe to be true.  Today’s key passage is a good example of this type of conflict.  The apostle Paul tells us that he has been given a “thorn” in his flesh to keep him from becoming conceited.  While we do not know exactly what this “thorn” was because Paul never provided details, some Biblical scholars have theorized that it might have been a disease such as malaria or epilepsy, or perhaps a problem with his vision.  Whatever the case, we can be sure it was some sort of physical ailment that made Paul’s mission in life more difficult.  Three times Paul pleaded with God to take this “thorn” away from him, but each time God refused, telling Paul, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” (Vs. 9)  What Paul goes on to say in verse 10 is the part that seems to conflict with what we believe to be true based on our human knowledge.  He says, “That is why, for Christ’s sake, I delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, in difficulties. For when I am weak, then I am strong.”

I love these examples when God takes our conventional earthly wisdom and turns it upside down.  Jesus said that whoever is first will be last and that the meek will inherit the earth and Paul said that when he is weak, then he is strong.  If you are wondering how this can be true, allow me to explain.  When we are strong, we tend to start to feel pride.  During our strongest moments, we feel like we can accomplish anything on our own, without any help.  While that might sound like a good thing, it is actually the opposite of what God wants for us.  God wants us not to try to accomplish things in our own strength, but to accomplish things through His strength.  He wants to be our source.  During our weakest moments, when things look dark and bleak, those are the times when we can turn to Him for strength.  More importantly, God’s strength is so much more than anything we can possibly muster on our own.  Therefore, when we are weak, we become strong because God gives us the strength we need to move forward.  When we tap into the power of Jesus Christ living through us, we become far more powerful than we can ever be on our own.  We can accomplish so much more than we could ever accomplish on our own.  When you are feeling your weakest, rejoice in knowing that you can find strength.  Rejoice in the knowledge that the power of Jesus Christ is available to you in your darkest hour.  Rejoice in knowing that when you are weak, then you are strong.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Dangerous Knowledge


Daily Bible Reading – Joshua 15-17; 1 Corinthians 8

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Corinthians 8:1-3

I heard a piece of tongue-in-cheek marital advice the other day, and it went something like this: “When you are wrong, confess it to your spouse immediately.  When you are right, do not say a word.”  I thought about that advice today as I read Paul’s remarks to the church in Corinth.  In our key passage today, Paul says, “We know that we all possess knowledge. Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up. The man who thinks he knows something does not yet know as he ought to know. But the man who loves God is known by God.” (1 Corinthians 8:1-3)  Paul is giving the Corinthians similar advice to the humorous marital advice above – no one likes a no-it-all.  Do not get me wrong here; we all know that knowledge is a good thing.  The more we learn about a particular topic, the better off we are, at least up to a point.  What Paul is talking about is what I like to refer to as dangerous knowledge.

So, what makes knowledge dangerous?  In our key passage, Paul says that knowledge “puffs up”.  When you hear that term, what kind of a person do you picture?  I picture a proud man – a man who thinks he knows it all.  I picture a man who believes he is right almost 100% of the time, and is not afraid to tell you about it.  I picture a man who believes being right is more important than being compassionate and loving.  In the interest of honesty, I have to admit at this point that I have struggled with this issue (as the people closest to me can attest).  I have felt this compulsive need to be right for as long as I can remember, and there are still times when I am acting in the flesh when this comes out of me.  It is something that God continues to work on in me, and I know that eventually He will rid me of it completely.  See, the issue here is really an issue of pride, and this pride is what makes knowledge dangerous.  When you get to the point where being right is more important than compassion, you have entered dangerous territory.  When you resist any kind of correction, you have entered dangerous territory.  When you have intolerance for opposing views, you have entered dangerous territory.  Dangerous knowledge can be toxic, both to yourself and to the people around you.  If left unchecked, this dangerous knowledge can lead to a condition where you stop putting your faith in God to provide for your needs.  When you wrongly believe that YOU can control your own destiny, you have definitely entered into VERY dangerous territory.

With all of that being said, what is the answer?  How can we ensure that our knowledge does not turn into dangerous knowledge?  The first step comes in understanding the sovereignty of God.  When you realize that He is control of everything and that He is the only one who is always right, you can start to escape the snare of dangerous knowledge and pride.  The second step is putting our focus on the life and sacrifice of Jesus Christ.  Compared to Jesus, who among us can claim to be perfect?  Who among us can claim to be right?  Christ came to this earth and lived a perfect life, and then died on a cross because of our sinfulness.  When we begin to exalt Him instead of ourselves, we can begin to get out of the danger zone.  Finally, the last step is love.  When we realize that God loves us unconditionally regardless of what we do, we can in turn begin to love others in this same way.  When you love another person unconditionally, you will want to build them up with that love instead of “puffing up” yourself.  At that point, being right loses all importance.

The next time you feel the overwhelming need to be right; I hope you will remember today’s key passage.  I hope that, like me, you will stop and remind yourself of Paul’s words.  Aside from that, if all else fails – when you are right, do not say a word.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Divisions in the Church


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 30,31; Psalm 40; 1 Corinthians 1

Today’s Key Passage – 1 Corinthians 1:10-17

During Paul’s third missionary journey in Ephesus, he received word of some problems that the church in Corinth was facing.  One of the problems plaguing the church at that time was disunity.  The Corinthians heard the Gospel from many different sources – some heard about Christ from Paul, while others heard from Peter and Apollos.  While Paul, Peter, and Apollos were all preaching the same Gospel, they each had their own style of preaching.  Because of the different styles of the preachers, the members of the church started to cling to the messenger instead of the message.  In 1 Corinthians 1:12, Paul explains the issue when he says, “What I mean is this: One of you says, “I follow Paul”; another, “I follow Apollos”; another, “I follow Cephas”; still another, “I follow Christ.”  This division in the church was hurting the church as a whole and was keeping the Corinthians from reaching their full potential.

We still run the risk of having divisions in the church today.  This could be divisions in a particular church congregation, or divisions of the church as a whole.  This becomes especially prevalent when we begin to think that “our way” is the only way.  As we all know, there are many different denominations of the Christian church and there are many different styles of worship.  In some churches, people sing hymns from a book while listening to an organist, while in other churches people sing popular Christian songs with a live band.  In some churches, you will see people with their hands raised in the air during worship, while in other churches that is completely taboo.  Some people think that their preacher is the best preacher and will gladly tell you so, while others believe the same thing about their preacher.  One believer might like a particular Christian author, while another believer might not.  All of these differences can lead, to a certain degree, to divisions in the body of Christ as a whole.

So why is this such an issue?  Why is disunity in the body of Christ or in a particular church congregation so bad?  To find the best answer to this question, we need only to look to Christ himself.  In Mark 3:25, Jesus said, “If a house is divided against itself, that house cannot stand.”  Disunity ruins churches and destroys their witness for Christ.  As we attempt to reach the lost and tell them about Jesus, we will not be nearly as successful if our church is divided.  We are all brothers and sisters in Christ.  We all worship the same God.  We are all saved by the same grace.  Do not allow your allegiance to any particular group or any particular style outweigh your allegiance to Christ.  Do not allow the externals get in the way of what is truly important.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.

Not by Our Own Righteousness


Daily Bible Reading – Deuteronomy 7-9; Mark 15

Today’s Key Passage – Deuteronomy 9:1-6

In today’s key passage, Moses continues his address to the Israelites before entering the Promised Land.  Moses reminds the people that when they cross the Jordan, they will face off against the Anakites – a group of very tall warriors roughly seven to nine feet tall.  Though the Anakites were stronger than the Israelites, the Israelites will still win the battle and take possession of the land because they have God on their side.  Moses then provides a warning.  He warns the people not to feel pride about winning the battle and taking the land.  Moses states, “It is not because of your righteousness or your integrity that you are going in to take possession of their land; but on account of the wickedness of these nations, the LORD your God will drive them out before you, to accomplish what he swore to your fathers, to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.” (9:5)

We can often be tempted to feel pride in our own accomplishments.  When we get a raise at work or make a sale, there is a temptation to believe that we accomplished the feat based on our own works.  God reminds us in His Word that these feelings of pride are wrong.  We are not successful on our own – we are successful because of God.  God provides every good thing that we have.  When we get the raise, it is because of God.  When we make the sale, it is because of God.  When we understand His role in everything that we do, we can stay away from the dangers of pride.

There is another danger that I think of, though, when I read today’s passage – the danger of self-righteousness.  For those of us who have been saved, self-righteousness can be a real problem if we are not careful.  Have you ever looked at another person – perhaps someone who is sinning or someone who is far away from God – and felt that you were in some way better than that person?  Have you ever thought to yourself, “At least I am not like that” or something similar?  I will be the first to admit that in the past, I have had thoughts like these.  Even if we do not have those thoughts directly, sometimes our words or our actions to others can make it seem like we are self-righteous.  Thinking or acting in a self-righteous way is not what God has in mind for us.  That is not how we show God’s love to others.  There is a very fine line between recognizing the fact that we are better than we used to be and believing the fallacy that we are better than others.  Moses reminds his people (and us) that being chosen as the children of God has nothing to do with us.  There is nothing there for us to feel proud about, because we are not chosen by God based on our works.  Paul reminds us in Romans 3:10 that, “there is no one righteous, not even one”.  We are chosen by His grace, and in the end, we will be saved by His grace.  When Christ returns in glory, we will all make our way into the Promised Land.  As we wait for that day, we must keep in mind that we will take possession of that land not because of our own righteousness, but because of God’s grace.

During your Bible reading today, what “key passages” stood out to you?  Leave a comment below to share what God is showing you about His Word today.

To become a fan of The Daily Bible Plan’s Facebook Page, CLICK HERE.

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If you like this post, please SHARE it with others to spread the Word of God.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you today.


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